Monster Court Case for Energy Drink Company

Energy Drinks

Consume with Caution

It appears that “Monster Energy Company” is heading to court on April 27th, 2015 over a wrongful death lawsuit stemming from the Death of nineteen year old Alex Morris, of Alameda County, CA. In an article written by Brenda Craig, it was stated that, “Alex Morris went into cardiac arrest and his girlfriend called for an ambulance.  He was experiencing an extreme atrial fibrillation event, and a short while later, Alex Morris, despite medical intervention, was pronounced dead at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in northern California.” It has been stated that Morris was a daily consumer of this energy drink, usually drinking about two cans per day since he was sixteen years old.  Post death reports confirmed that Morris had also consumed two 16oz cans of Monster Energy Drink within twenty four hours of his death.

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LAPD Officers Settle Discrimination Lawsuit

Police Tape

The Blame Game

Recently, a decision has been made about an incident involving two Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers suing the department for discrimination because they are Latino. Officers Allan Corrales and George Diego were awarded near $4 million combined in their discrimination suit against the department. Both officers are Latino and were involved in a fatal shooting in 2010 killing an unarmed, autistic African American man, Eugene Washington.

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Protein Powder Ripping Off Athletes

Day47:Weights

Bodybuilders Beware

Several companies have been on the receiving end of lawsuits claiming lack of protein in their supplements. A large number of the companies in this $7 billion industry are being accused of selling products with less protein content than what they advertise on the label. “Arnold Schwarzenegger Series Iron Mass, for instance, contains half the protein stated on its label, according to third party testing in one lawsuit”. FDA regulations require that content labels on all dietary supplements be accurate and not misleading to the consumers. In this case the expectation is that protein content be evaluated based on actual protein sources, not fillers such as amino acids.

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D’oh! Simpsons Settle with Hologram Company

Giant Homer Simpson on Giant Hill, Cerne Abbas, by Wikipedia User GeographBot, licensed by Creative Commons.

Mmm, lawsuits.

The Simpsons are going to court! Well, they were planning on it, until reaching a settlement. 20th Century Fox recently came to an out-of-court settlement with a special effects company over a 2-minute hologram of the popular cartoon character, Homer Simpson. Appearing at Comic-Con, an entertainment-themed convention in California, Homer’s hologram told several jokes and interacted with Simpsons’ creator Matt Groening, much to the amusement of everyone other than Hologram USA. The company claims that they have an exclusive patent to the technology behind the hologram, and that without their consent or approval, Fox owes them a monetary fee. The groups were able to meet and come to an agreement, although the terms were not immediately disclosed. Read more

Former Hockey Star Sues Referee on the Fly

Linesmen attempt to break up a fight around the Tampa Bay goal during the first ice hockey playoff game between the Ottawa Senators and the Tampa Bay Lightning by Wikipedia User Leec44, licensed by Creative Commons.

Refs and players have always had a frosty relationship.

Professional athletes and referees have never gotten along too well, but an NHL legend is bringing this disagreement with an official to the next level. Former Philadelphia Flyer Eric Lindros is suing referee Paul Stewart for defamation of character after the ref’s comments in an article for the Huffington Post. Early in the 1990′s, Stewart and Lindros had a disagreement during a game, which played into the controversial incident. Stewart claims that after the game, he approached the 19-year-old Lindros and asked him to sign some posters for a charity event. The referee claims Lindros ripped the posters in half, and proceeded to verbally assault him. The Flyer Captain has come out and defended himself, balking at the idea that he is unnecessarily hostile and not charitable. Lindros is seeking $250,000 from both Stewart and the Huffington Post for running the story. Read more