Oklahoma Tackles the Opioid Epidemic

Alarming epidemic

Since 1999, over 700,000 people in the United States have died from drug overdoses.  In response to this seemingly uncontrollable epidemic, the state of Oklahoma is stepping up as one of the first states to hold pharmaceutical companies accountable. Earlier this week, a judge ruled that Johnson & Johnson must pay $572 million for their role in the overdose death count.  In 2017 alone, 68% of the 70,000 US overdoses were at the hands of an opioid.  This landmark case cites Oklahoma’s public nuisance law and the argument that Johnson & Johnson put people in harm by engaging in “false and misleading marketing of both their drugs and opioids.” The state of Oklahoma blames Johnson & Johnson for the influx of opioids in the state. Read more

Jurisdiction Unknown

The first space crime

Initiated in November 1998, the International Space Station is a monumental project, and has served as living quarters to astronauts since the year 2000. Among the valuable scientific research that takes place on the Space Station, it is also home to the first space crime.  Anne McClain has recently gained infamy for allegedly tapping into her estranged spouse’s bank account while onboard the Space Station.  While no money was stolen from the account, McClain’s spouse, Summer Worden, learned of the invasion of privacy when McClain communicated with Worden about her spending habits.  An investigation is currently underway. Read more

A Major Problem in a Minor League

Home run for minor leaguers

In a bill passed by Congress in March 2018, there is a short section entitled “Save America’s Pastime Act,” which intends to prevent minor league players from taking legal action against Major League Baseball.  The Act ensures minor league baseball players are paid federal minimum wages for a 40-hour work week; however, they are not guaranteed overtime pay.  The MLB’s push for this Act came in response to a federal class action lawsuit filed in 2014 on behalf of 45 minor league baseball players who alleged they did not receive fair wages.    Read more

Grab a Lyft to Compensation

On the road again

In the most recent class action lawsuit filed against Lyft, claimants are alleging misclassification of their employment status with the popular transportation company.  Incorrectly identified as independent contractors, Lyft drivers must adhere to strict standards that would normally fall under the classification of an employee, not an independent contractor.  The principal claimant, Donald Brunner Jr., who filed the class action in the Northern District of California is arguing that drivers are not compensated for their overtime, minimum wage, or expense reimbursement.  The class action also points to Lyft’s lack of providing itemized wage statements and keeping correct payroll documentation.    Read more

Heaping Class Action Filed in Response to Burning Trash

On fire

The South Carolina neighborhood of Ridgeland is under fire, literally.  A landfill owned by Able Contracting has been burning for over a month, since June, to the point of probable contamination. Due to the landfill owner’s apparent negligence, a class action lawsuit was filed on behalf of a construction company located close by to the burning site.  The class action was filed with the intention of compensating residents and business owners in the surrounding area for a decline in property value, a decrease in potential revenue, and personal injury.  Many residents voluntarily left their homes, and some are starting to cope with the possibility that they may never return to their homes. Read more