Cards on the Table in Star Wars Lawsuit

King High Poker hand, by flickr user Guts Gaming, licensed by Creative Commons

“I’ve got a bad feeling about this.”

A mobile game developer has been dealt a bad hand after naming one of their card games apps after a fictional Star Wars property. The lawsuit was filed by Disney and Lucasfilm in the state of California and seeks to protect its intellectual property and trademarks. The app is modeled after a game called “Sabaac”, which is how Harrison Ford’s character Han Solo came about winning his infamous ship, the Millennium Falcon. The app maker is a company called Ren Ventures, which happens to be named after a character in 2015’s Star Wars movie The Force Awakens. Disney recently released Star Wars Episode IX The Last Jedi in the theaters, and is also gearing up for a new film revolving around a “young Han Solo”. Rumors are that the card game could play a pivotal part in the plot of that movie. Read More

Agricultural States are Cracking Away the California Egg Law

Farmers refuse to walk on egg shells

Due to the chain of events stemming from a California vote in 2008, a challenge was made to the US Supreme Court recently on behalf of thirteen states. Voters in California were in favor of fighting for the living conditions of hens that are bred to lay eggs for farmers. A law was passed in compliance to the vote to require all hens at least 116 square inches of room to stretch their limbs and lay down throughout the day. Read more

No California Love for NFL’s Rams

rams by pixabay user PublicDomainPictures / 18042 images, licensed by creative commons.

Feeling sheepish

The National Football League is no stranger to off the field issues, and it looks like they’re going back to the courtroom. The City of St. Louis claims that the Rams, who have moved from Missouri to Los Angeles, have violated their own “relocation guidelines”. A group of about 100 plaintiffs is upset about how the Rams went about the process and are looking for their pound of flesh. Not only was the football franchise named, but also the NFL itself, plus it’s 32 league owners. St. Louis Circuit Court Judge Christopher McGraugh ruled that the lawsuit would not be dismissed or brought to arbitration, which is a win for the football fans in the mid-west. Ironically, the Rams have returned to prominence since going back to Los Angeles, on the strength of top draft pick Todd Gurley and 31-year-old head coach Sean McVay. Read More