Housing Hostility

Discrimination dispute

A Boca Raton, FL community of 700 affluent homes is the location of one of the more recent legal disputes involving alleged discrimination. One of the residents, who identifies as Christian, claims that she has been the subject of religious discrimination within a community that is primarily Jewish. Known as Seven Bridges, the homes are maintained by an HOA. Those living there may enjoy access to tennis courts, a pool, and a clubhouse. The Christian resident, whom is the plaintiff in the case, said she was denied access to these amenities for 330 days following a spat with one of her Jewish neighbors. The plaintiff was also subjected to a $5,000 fine for her part in the dispute. For what she identifies as a hostile housing environment, the plaintiff filed a lawsuit against the HOA for neglecting to resolve the matter. Read more

Home Improvement Mishap

Renovation dispute

When renovating your home, it is imperative to hire competent contractors that will do the job right the first time.  A Springfield couple performed their due diligence in hiring Home Depot to completely reconstruct their new home.  The renovation would include a new kitchen and bathroom, and new flooring and windows. Home Depot subcontracted the job to B. Lombardi & Sons of Cedar Grove, Verona and Roseland.  The couple is now suing both parties for incomplete work and violations of the Consumer Fraud Act and the Home Improvement Practices Act.  In addition, the couple claims the contractors used poor quality building materials and breached their contracts. Read more

Suing Over Septic

Homeowner’s nightmare

Updating and repairing a house comes with the job of being a homeowner.  While some homes undergo massive remodels, others are subject to minor aesthetic alterations.  Replacing the existing septic system or hot water heater are not exciting projects, but they may be necessary to keep up with building codes or the basic functioning of the home.  Donald Woods is one such homeowner who was required by the town of Southampton, NY to update his home due to an apparent permit that was not acquired in the mid-1960’s when the second story to the home was built.  Woods purchased the home in 2003.  In order to bring the home up to code, Woods was instructed to install a new and improved septic system that would reduced nitrogen contribution. Read more

Grab Your Margaritas, the Lawsuit is Over

Will it help the economy?

The parties involved in a lawsuit, which stalled the building of a Margaritaville resort in Fort Myers Beach, FL, have come to an agreement.  The plaintiffs in the case alleged that the construction and plan for the resort was arguably unconstitutional and would lead to a negative impact due to its size and density.  This lawsuit, however, was not the sole complaint about the project, as other lawsuits in the past have been filed in an attempt to stop the development.  Naturally, the litigation costs required of the lawsuits have hindered the financing of the project itself.  Despite any downfalls or roadblocks that the lawsuits have caused, the plan to create the resort is now underway. Read more

Erasing History?

Highway draws to a close

At the beginning of 2018, the ownership rights to the local attraction, Centralia Graffiti Highway, fell into the hands of neighboring property owners, including Pagnotti Enterprises.  The State of Pennsylvania gave up rights to the road once it was determined the road would never be safe again to use as a highway.  Although the easement was lifted, Graffiti Highway continued to attract visitors from all areas.  About three quarters of a mile in length, the highway was covered with public art, colorful drawings, words, and images.  Interested parties would ignore the ‘no trespassing’ signs to experience the obviously unique spectacle.  Pagnotti Enterprises, which now owns a majority of the road, has made a bold decision that some feel is disrespectful to the legacy of Centralia.  Others see Pagnotti Enterprises’ choice to pave over the road as a solution to the overpopulation of visitors to the area. Read more