Racing for a Win in the Courtroom

They’re not horsing around

In the aftermath of perhaps one of the largest upsets in horse racing history, the owners of the would-be triumphant horse, Maximum Security, filed a lawsuit in the US District Court in Frankfort, KY.  Those who did not tune into the 145th Kentucky Derby on May 4 missed a historically controversial event.  Maximum Security allegedly interfered with other horses during part of the race, and as a result, two jockeys challenged the victory.  After a prolonged and careful review of the entire race, the three stewards decided that Maximum Security did impede the momentum of other horses.  With Maximum Security’s disqualification, the second place finisher, Country House, was announced as the winner of the Derby.  Although this was a heartbreaking loss for the otherwise undefeated Maximum Security, his owners, Gary and Mary West, are not accepting the defeat without a fight. Read more

Veterans Battle Against Earplug Company

Their voices will be heard

If you are a veteran who wore 3M Combat Arms earplugs from 2003 to 2015, then you may be entitled to receive compensation for this defective product. According to lawsuits filed by hundreds of military vets, the earplugs were not manufactured properly to prevent harmful sounds from entering their ears. As a result, veterans are now suffering from tinnitus, hearing loss, and balance issues. 3M failed to disclose any defects associated with the dual-sided earplugs. In an attempt to overcome the accusation against the company, 3M offered to settle a lawsuit filed by the US government for $9.1 million in July 2018. This payout did not prove 3M’s guilt or responsibility, but rather served as a remedy for the allegation against the company for making false claims about the use of the product. Injured veterans are now holding the Saint Paul, MN-based 3M directly responsible for negligence. Read more

Figuring out a Virginia Statue Dispute

Erasing history?

In February 2017, the Charlottesville, VA City Council voted in favor of removing the statues of General Robert E. Lee and General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson from public parks in the city.  Prevalent characters in any American history book, these two men served as leaders of the Confederate military.  For their integral roles in the Civil War, they were honored with statues, erected in Charlottesville public parks in the early 1920’s.  Due to the sensitive nature of what these statues may represent, the Council agreed to have them taken down.  Supporters of preserving the historical significance of the statues, however, disagreed with the Council’s decision, and filed a lawsuit against the city in March 2017. Read more

Patient Has Her Sights on Compensation

An eye for an eye

We only get two eyes.  If we lose one, it does not grow back.  If damaged, the optic nerve cannot be transplanted.  When it is necessary to undergo surgery on the eye, or eyes, trust the operating doctor and read all paperwork in its entirety.  In August 2017, Sutton Dryfhout granted her pediatric ophthalmologist permission to operate on her left eye to correct a lazy eye and remove a cyst.  In a lawsuit filed in Cook County, IL recently, Dryfhout claims that her trusted doctor not only operated on the incorrect eye, but also falsified already signed paperwork. Dryfhout now suffers from continuous optical complications, including double vision.  Read more