A Laced Latte in Lethbridge, Canada

One contaminated latte, coming up!

Accidents can happen anywhere, even in Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada, where one 32-week pregnant woman purchased a laced latte at McDonald’s in August 2018.  Sarah Douglas allowed it to cool before taking a sip.  She detected a strange taste to the latte and is now considering filing a lawsuit against McDonald’s for what was later discovered floating around in her beverage.  Available in Small, Medium, and Large, McDonald’s advertises their 140 calorie lattes as a “treat” customized with “steamed whole or nonfat milk” with “your favorite flavor, including a rich vanilla latte, a toasty caramel latte, or a sweet, earthy hazelnut latte.”  In this case, Sarah Douglas purchased a latte steamed with a chemical flavor. Read more

Paws and Consider What Your Dogs Are Eating

Are you going to eat that?

Champion Pet Food manufactures two brands of dry dog food, Orijen and Acana, which are both named in a recent class action lawsuit. The parent company is under scrutiny for negligently failing to list and mention in the dog food packaging and advertising, the presence of heavy toxins. The dangerous chemicals and metals include arsenic, lead, bisphenol (BPA), mercury, and cadmium. BPA is not a chemical commonly associated with pet foods. Not only are these toxins harmful to dogs, but the company deliberately failed to disclose these ingredients to the dog owners who regularly purchase the dry dog food. Read more

Does That Apple Look A Little Big To You?

Square Watermelon!, by Flickr user solution_63, licensed via Creative Commons.

Square Watermelon! Unnatural, but fits perfectly on the shelves!

Proposition 37, which sought to require Big Food companies to properly label genetically-modified foods (GMO’s), recently failed among California voters.  GMO’s are formulated through genetic engineering and often require exposure to radiation or chemicals to serve as a catalyst in the transformation.  GMO leaders, most notably Missouri-based Monsanto, allotted over $45 million towards a “No on 37” campaign to fight the proposition’s approval.  The movement also received contributions from Coca-Cola, Nestle, and Kraft and took part in misrepresentation of the act that boasts “Stop the deceptive food labeling scheme.”  The Big Food propaganda was ultimately a success, as it is believed that many whom voted against Prop 37 were swayed by the aggressive campaign.

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