Motel 10 Million

Privacy scandal

According to court documents, for over two and a half years, Motel 6 employees provided guest information to Immigration and Customers Enforcement agents.  With the information provided, officers screened anyone listed with a Hispanic-sounding last name.  Some of the identifiers obtained include license plate numbers, full names, birthdays, and room numbers.  While some individuals were simply “looked into,” others were detained or arrested. These guest lists were willingly handed over without warrants or subpoenas.  As a result, the civil rights activist group Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a class action lawsuit in January 2018. Read more

Streaming a Settlement

Students hear good news

The National Association of the Deaf did not remain silent when online video lectures posted for programs through Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology did not include captions or subtitles.  Those who are hard of hearing were not capable of learning from online educational material.  Given the public forum of the posted videos, the subject was considered a federal issue. While the videos were open to any individuals who had access to the internet, not everyone was able to learn from the resources provided.  The 2015 lawsuit has finally seen resolution. Read more

An Infantile Misrepresentation

Tylenol lawsuits continue

If you purchased Infants’ Tylenol any time from October 2014 to January 6, 2020, you may be entitled to a few bucks.  Johnson and Johnson received negative backlash following the infamous talcum powder dispute and the company remains under scrutiny due to misrepresented pill bottles.  According to this most recent lawsuit, Johnson and Johnson allegedly advertises on its packaging that their Infants’ Tylenol is specially manufactured to supply a safe dosage for infants.  On the contrary, the concentration of acetaminophen is 160 mg, the same level found in Johnson and Johnson’s Children’s Tylenol. Read more

Song Dispute Tunes Out

Can’t stop the music

Although the terms of the settlement were not disclosed, Miley Cyrus has settled a $300 million lawsuit concerning the origins of her popular hit “We Can’t Stop.”  Initially filed in 2018, Michael May, also known as Flourgon, accused Cyrus and Sony Corp’s RCA Records of negligently infringing upon the copyright of his 1988 song, “We Run Things.”  While a similarity exists in one of the lyrics, the two songs are not identical, so is this really a case of copyright infringement?  The two parties involved have not left the matter for the courts to decide.   Read more

Furnishing a Resolution in Toddler Death Case

Ikea settles

Ikea has made headlines recently as the defendant in the largest single plaintiff wrongful death settlement in US history.  The resolution follows a claim filed in June 2018, alleging inadequate steps taken by Ikea to ensure its furniture is safe and secure for all consumers.  The lawsuit also blames Ikea for not acting hastily when learning of the extreme dangers associated with their signature Malm dresser. Read more