Operating on Autopilot

Hardly working.

While some employees wish they could take a quick nap while their bosses are not looking, one California DMV employee took snoozing on the job to a whole new level.  From February 2014 until December 2017, the worker slept at least 3 hours a day at her job.  The daily naps continued for nearly 4 years, with little to no discipline issued to her by supervisors. Read more

Things Get Stranger: Man Sues Netflix

Thunderstorm, by flickr user Thomas Bresson, licensed by Creative Commons.

There’s a storm coming

Netflix has had tons of success in the last few years, rising from the ashes to become a technology powerhouse. The business model is a low cost, subscription-based service providing content to consumers who love their tv shows and movies. One of the most successful pieces of original content is the Netflix-original Stranger Things, a sci-fi / fantasy series about kids in the 1980s who experience (you guessed it) “strange things”. Even stranger is that the now famous images used to promote the show, which an ominous thunderstorm system moving through the clouds, allegedly infringes on a Montana photographer’s copyright. As such, he is taking Netflix to court and seeking damages regarding this misuse of his image. Read more

Cheaters Never Win

Love hurts.

Typically, adultery is mentioned as a cause for divorce, but in the state of North Carolina, it may be grounds for a lawsuit. Francisco Huizar III plans to appeal an order requiring him to pay $8.8 million to the husband of a woman he romantically pursued for 16 months. Despite the debate behind North Carolina’s arguably outdated alienation of affection laws, Keith King felt it necessary to take legal action against the man whom he points to as the catalyst for his shattered marriage to Danielle Swords. Read more

Facebook Advertisers Call Foul

thumb thumbs up hand finger top tip, by pixabay user LoggaWiggler, licensed by Creative Commons.

Thumbs down

Another day, another Facebook lawsuit. This time around, the slings and arrows aimed at Mark Zuckerberg and co are from their advertisers, who claim that the Facebook ad platform misled them. The main point of contention is the “Potential Reach” number, an ambiguous total provided by Facebook to help agencies spend their money. Unfortunately, an astute advertiser noticed that the “Potential Reach” number for Facebook users between 18-34 actually exceeds the amount of people in that age group, in every state. This particular social media lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court in North California, and will likely bring in more plaintiffs. Read more

Fire Rises in Tinder Lawsuit

Flames, by flickr user William Warby, licensed by Creative Commons.

…And the flames went higher

These days, young people much prefer searching through their phone to meet people instead of actual face to face conversation. Technology has transformed the dating world, led by apps such as Tinder. Users can swipe right on anyone in their area they might be interested in meeting up with for a date. Valued at over $1.3B in 2015 with a ceiling of over $3B based of downloads and subscriptions, there is no doubt that Tinder was a home run for the co-founders. However, much like dating these days, there is not always smooth sailing. In a new lawsuit, the original co-founders are suing the current owners, claiming they inflated the valuation and seeking over $2B in damages. Read more