Brady vs. NFL Lawsuit Full of Hot Air

Football field, by flickir user nightthree, licensed by Creative Commons.

Ball so hard

The saga of deflated footballs and a certain A-list quarterback have not left headlines since the winter of 2014. Now, months later, we are all following the twists and turns of the story, including NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s attempt to keep Tom Brady off the field in September. This seemed to be the final straw for Brady and Patriots Owner Robert Kraft to fire back at Goodell and the NFL, opting for a New York courtroom over the sunny, green fields of Foxborough, MA. There are several undertones here, including the NFL Players Association’s potential second thoughts about granting Goodell his current power, plus the Commissioner’s personal relationship with Kraft. How did letting air out of a football lead to a corporate showdown and legal dispute, centered around a high profile athlete? Read more

Mayweather-Pacquiao Promoters Get Jabbed

Faded Glory, by flickr user Bryan Furnance, licensed by Creative Commons.

Jab, Cross, Hook

The sport of boxing has not had much of an impact on pop culture or news headlines in the past 20 years, and the latest event may have put the sport down for the count. The heavily-promoted match between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao has come under serious criticism for how uneventful and expensive it was, and now people are calling their lawyers. Multiple class-action lawsuits have been filed against all parties involved, especially the promoters of the fight itself. The pay-per-view main event charged $99 per household, with Mayweather winning in unexciting fashion; however it was revealed after the match that Pacquiao had a pretty serious shoulder injury. Plaintiff’s claim that they were duped into paying for the fight regardless of the promoters’ knowledge of the injury, choosing to “go on with the show” due to the massive amounts of money each company pulled in from advertising.

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Former Hockey Star Sues Referee on the Fly

Linesmen attempt to break up a fight around the Tampa Bay goal during the first ice hockey playoff game between the Ottawa Senators and the Tampa Bay Lightning by Wikipedia User Leec44, licensed by Creative Commons.

Refs and players have always had a frosty relationship.

Professional athletes and referees have never gotten along too well, but an NHL legend is bringing this disagreement with an official to the next level. Former Philadelphia Flyer Eric Lindros is suing referee Paul Stewart for defamation of character after the ref’s comments in an article for the Huffington Post. Early in the 1990′s, Stewart and Lindros had a disagreement during a game, which played into the controversial incident. Stewart claims that after the game, he approached the 19-year-old Lindros and asked him to sign some posters for a charity event. The referee claims Lindros ripped the posters in half, and proceeded to verbally assault him. The Flyer Captain has come out and defended himself, balking at the idea that he is unnecessarily hostile and not charitable. Lindros is seeking $250,000 from both Stewart and the Huffington Post for running the story. Read more

College Sued by Football Star’s Accuser

DSC02151, by flickr user Matthew Stinson, licensed by Creative Commons.

State of Confusion

The woman who brought a lawsuit against Florida State’s quarterback is heading back to the courtroom. Citing a “hostile educational environment”, the plaintiff became famous for accusing the college’s athletic department for covering up rape allegations against Jameis Winston, the man under center for the Seminoles as they went undefeated in 2014. She cites Title IX, a civil rights law protecting the rights of all students under the Higher Education Amendment of 1972. The woman claims Winston, the 2013 Heisman Trophy Winner, sexually harassed her in 2012, but a case was never filed at the time. This latest lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Middle District of Florida in Orlando.

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Legalized Sports Gambling Strikes Out, For Now

Las Vegas sportsbook, by wikipedia user Baishampayan Ghos, licensed by Creative Commons

There’s No Place Like Home

The NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL were quick to remind New Jersey that there’s no such thing as a safe bet. The major professional sports leagues have filed a lawsuit against a recently passed law that had the hopes of on-site legalized sports gambling. Currently, the only place in the United States where you can place a live bet on pro sports is Las Vegas, but NJ Governor Chris Christie has other ideas in mind. Monmouth Park, a racetrack in South Jersey, was on the verge of being able to accept bets for NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, and NCAA games before the lawsuit was filed. The federal court quickly agreed with the sports leagues, and now New Jersey will have to find an alternative route to taking legal sports bets.

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