Supreme Court Takes Gamble on Sports

Casino by Flickr user Judy Baxter, Licensed by Creative Commons

Place your bets

A cheer could be heard from residents across the tri-state area (New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut) when the decision came through. After 6 years of failure, the Supreme Court decided against a law preventing U.S. States from allowing its citizens to gamble on sports. New Jersey is at the top of the list and looks to use their newly found legislative freedom to pump life back into the struggling Atlantic City. While sports gambling is already legal in Nevada, this decision will allow each state to decide whether or not they accept bets on all major league sports, including the NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL. The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, passed in 1992, allowed Nevada (and specifically Las Vegas) to become the mecca of sports gambling, and since then other states across the country have been left in the financial dust. Read More

Ink Not Dry on LeBron Tattoo Lawsuit

Basketball, by flickr user Ryan Fung, licensed by Creative Commons.

Heating up

The world of video games has become very realistic as technology continues to advance. In the 1980s and 1990s, the additions of player’s actual names in sports games was a huge step to creating a more immersive experience. In the 00’s, the blank faces and stares of old video game character models became much more realistic, if not lifelike, replications of famous athletes. Today, guys like LeBron James in Take-Two Interactive’s NBA 2k series is a dead-on representation, right on down to the tattoos. However, this has now caused a brand new issue and interesting talking point. A tattoo company with copyrighted images of the tattoo work has filed a lawsuit, claiming copyright infringement.   Read More

Fishy Decision for Miami’s Marlins

White Marlin in North Caorlina, by flickr user Dominic Sherony, licensed by Creative Commons.

Gone Fishin’

The beauty of sportsmanship is trying to out-perform and out-think the competition. A baseball team based in Florida is now trying to claim that, legally, their ownership group is based in the British Virgin Islands. This would mean that any governance by the United States or Florida would not have jurisdiction, and any decisions would have to be filed in Island nation. This would also take a recent lawsuit brought against the Miami Marlins and their former owner, Jeffrey Loria, and essentially throw it overboard. Miami-Dade County and the city of Miami itself are seeking compensation after Loria allegedly over-promised, under-delivered, than sold the Major League Baseball franchise for $1.2 billion. Read More

The Yankees’ Negligence May Cost Them a Nose and an Eye

Line drives may strike fans

America’s favorite pastime can become dangerous if fans do not pay attention to their surroundings. Foul balls and broken bats are common accidents within the ball park environment. When purchasing a game ticket, a fan is entering a contract to assume the risk of injury. In many instances, the “Baseball Rule” applies, where a fan cannot seek damages for wounds sustained during a major league game. One possible exception to that rule is when a child is involved.

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Personal Foul: Allegations Surround Super Bowl

Football Ellipse, by flickr user Elvert Barnes, licensed by Creative Commons.

Roughing the passer

Peyton Manning is well known as the mature father figure of the National Football League. Unfortunately, the Super Bowl XLVI winning quarterback of the Denver Broncos has made unwanted headlines this week for his association with a 1997 University of Tennessee sexual harassment lawsuit. Dr. Jamie Naughright, former Director of Health & Wellness at the University of Tennessee, reported that Peyton Manning exposed himself to her while she was examining his foot in the locker room.  In his book “Manning: A Father, His Sons and A Football Legacy” Manning accounted the incident as a harmless locker-room exchange where he was “mooning” a fellow player. Manning called the event “crude maybe, but harmless”. Read More