Drawing Their Line in the Sand

Beach front battle

The beach is one of the earth’s most mesmerizing and extraordinary gifts.  While some beaches are privately owned and shielded from public use, others require a fee to enjoy or are just free to access.  For those who own beach or lakefront properties, watching locals or tourists flooding your view of the lake or ocean is imaginably undesirable.  On the other hand, locals and tourists want to gain entry to some of the best coastal fishing, surfing, or sunbathing spots.  These two points of view is what fueled a 2018 lawsuit and eventual decision by the Indiana Supreme Court, granting public entry to Lake Michigan’s shoreline.           Read more

Supreme Court Takes Gamble on Sports

Place your bets

A cheer could be heard from residents across the tri-state area (New Jersey, New York, and Connecticut) when the decision came through. After 6 years of failure, the Supreme Court decided against a law preventing U.S. States from allowing its citizens to gamble on sports. New Jersey is at the top of the list and looks to use their newly found legislative freedom to pump life back into the struggling Atlantic City. While sports gambling is already legal in Nevada, this decision will allow each state to decide whether or not they accept bets on all major league sports, including the NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL. The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, passed in 1992, allowed Nevada (and specifically Las Vegas) to become the mecca of sports gambling, and since then other states across the country have been left in the financial dust. Read More

Spider-Man Swings to Supreme Court

Trapped in a web

If you are a child during the holiday season, there may be no better gift than a brand new Spider-Man toy. However, it appears that a trademark lawsuit may keep some Marvel merchandise off the shelves. A man named Stephen Kimble invented a toy glove that fires silly string, allowing kids to pretend they are the web-slinging hero Spider-Man. Marvel bought the idea and had been paying Kimble royalties from sales, until his patent on the idea ran out. Furious, the inventor filed a lawsuit to overturn a 50-year-old Supreme Court ruling about expiring patents, seemingly forcing Spider-Man to trade in his red-and-blue spandex for a suit and tie. Read more

Traffic Light Lawsuit in Chicago Stopped Short

Stop! Hey, what’s that sound?

Aggressive drivers would be the first to tell you that traffic cameras are a major inconvenience. A recent class-action lawsuit was filed Chicago, contesting tickets given to motorists who had been caught running red lights. The lawsuit reached the Illinois Supreme Court before being struck down. The city had always stood behind the right to enforce these traffic laws under a “homefield advantage” policy, and eventually filed an ordinance in 2006. The class-action suit was aimed to dispute any traffic tickets given between 2003-2006. Read more

Class Action: Galaxy of Interns Gets a Guardian

Employment Lawyers, Assemble!

While the stars are aligning for Marvel at the box office, it appears that one former employee is trying to become the First Avenger. Kenneth Jackson, who worked for the company for part of 2008, recently filed a class action lawsuit and is seeking lost wages and back pay. Jackson was reportedly classified as an “intern”, although he worked full 40 hour-per-week shifts Monday through Friday for the better part of 5 months. Along with Mr. Jackson are 100 other Marvel interns seeking compensation. The lawsuit was filed in New York’s Supreme Court.

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