Gatehouse Media Publishes Terms for a Settlement

Magazine Colors Media Page, by pixabay user kconcha, licensed by Creative Commons.

Gatehouse Media LLC customers turn a page.

A reluctance to disclose all terms of a contract or deal may be perceived as deceptive and unethical. By not outlining the specifics of the subscriptions to various publications, Massachusetts born Gatehouse Media LLC has violated the consumer rights of its subscribers. The customers’ expectations did not match what the company actually offered.  The plaintiffs of the class action lawsuit purchased either one-year or 26-week subscriptions, but also received magazines that did not pertain to the same genre or interests of the publications they purchased. Read more

Aaron Hernandez ‘Victim’ Seeks $100,000

Football field, by flickr user nightthree, licensed by Creative Commons

More than just a 15-yard penalty

Unsportsmanlike conduct could be a bit of an understatement.  After being indicted for the alleged murder of a man in Massachusetts, Aaron Hernandez, former Tight End for the New England Patriots, is also being sued.  Alexander Buckley claims that when Hernandez was in college in Florida, he was “shot and left for dead” by the former NFL star.  Summoned to the stand during the grand jury investigation into Hernandez, Buckley was asked about the incident that left him with a missing eye.  A Superior Court judge in Falls River, MA motioned to see what more information Buckley had against Hernandez.  Buckley is seeking $100,000 in damages. Read more

Star Wars-Type Technology Coming to Life

robot hand by Flickr user uwnews, licensed by Creative Commons

                         Robotic Hand

As a disability and personal injury lawyer, it pains me to see my clients in agony.  It is just as disheartening to see children and veterans suffer.

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Videotaping Police: Dangerous, Lucrative, and Constitutionally Protected

Camera equipment, by Flickr user joshjanssen, licensed via Creative Commons
You should record the Po Po by all means, but you probably don’t need all this.

Two court settlements have come down this week that shine light on the increasingly-common practice of videotaping police officers.  In Las Vegas, Mitchell Crooks was beaten  up by a police officer while videotaping a burglary investigation across the street from his house.  In Boston, attorney Simon Glik was arrested and prosecuted under wiretapping laws for using his cell phone to record an arrest of another man.  All charges were dropped in both cases, but both men also sued for violations to their civil rights.  In both cases, they reached a settlement before going to court for a judgement, with Crooks receiving $100,000 and Glik receiving $170,000.  Nearly 6 months ago, Glik’s case even went to the 1st Circuit Appeals Court, where they upheld the rights of citizens to record public police action in a landmark, often-cited decision.

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Free Speech Lawsuit Settled for $75,000

The First Amendment guarantees the right to free speech to all people, even if you don’t agree with what they’re saying.  The town of South Hadley in Massachusetts learned that the hard way, as they have paid out a large sum of money for attempting to silence a critic at a public school board meeting in April, 2010.  Luke Gelinas was at the meeting to read a prepared statement in which he criticized the school board’s inaction regarding the bullying of a student — inaction which may have led to the student’s suicide.  According to the Boston Globe, Gelinas was interrupted by school board member Edward Boisselle, who told him “you’re done” and explicitly said “this is not your First Amendment right”.  In fact, it was not only Gelinas’s right to speak at a meeting with public officials, but I would also argue that it is Boisselle’s duty to uphold that right.  Gelinas was escorted out of the meeting, but wasn’t finished.  He filed a complaint and has waged a two-year legal battle to affirm his rights.  Today, via a settlement of $75,000, he has been vindicated.

What kind of country would we be if all detractors and critics and informed intellectuals were silenced by those in power and led out of the room for holding an unpopular opinion?  Well, we’d be 18th-century Britain.  This is exactly the reason the Declaration of Independence was written.  “Taxation without representation”, a popular phrase at the time, was really more about how the British government refused to listen to the needs of the colonists.  The Americans were, to draw a parallel to this case, told to leave and that they did not have the right to speak freely in Parliament.  In response, they waged a revolution, built a new country, and the rest is history.  While I’m not about to recommend breaking ties with South Hadley and forming a new city, I will posit this case as a reminder that the Bill of Rights is a document crafted to protect the people of the US from their government, and this is precisely why.