Apple Lawsuit Slows Down

How reliable is your phone?

At the end of February, a two-year-long class action lawsuit wrapped up, concerning Apple iPhones and the complaints that software updates caused function slow-down.  Owners of older iPhones, such as the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6S, 6S Plus, 7, and 7 Plus, were the victims of this system speed change. Despite the public assuming Apple’s motive was to entice iPhone users to upgrade to newer models, Apple insists that the software was meant to alleviate issues with older lithium-ion batteries. Regardless of the intent, Apple has agreed to settle the class action for a minimum amount of $310 million and a maximum amount of $500 million. Read more

Saving Lives? There’s an App for That

Texting while driving, by Simone Cosimi Giornalista, licensed by Creative Commons.

Keep your eyes on the road

In the United States, distracted driving is a growing problem. Among its many causes – from brushing teeth to changing clothes – texting is the worst offender. National Safety Council statistics show that texting while driving causes 1.6 million accidents and 4,015 deaths each year, and over 1,100 injuries daily. Ironically, a solution to this deadly problem lies with one of its main causes – the Apple iPhone. Read More

Snapchat Settles With Ousted Co-Founder

My Camera, by Flickr user Paul Reynolds, licensed by Creative Commons.

But first…

After a long legal battle, Snapchat has come to a settlement with Reggie Brown, who claimed he was a third co-founder of the wildly successful company. “His suit alleged that he had been a third co-founder alongside CEO Evan Spiegel and Bobby Murphy, the technology chief, and that they had kicked him out one month before the photo-sharing app launched in July 2011″. Spiegel and Murphy recently admitted that they did not come up with the idea for Snapchat on their own, and Brown was involved in the process. The company is now valued at $10 Billion, when Brown filed the lawsuit in February 2013 it was valued at $70 million. The terms of the settlement have not been released.

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Time to Go Mobile as Judge Rules Against NSA

Bundesarchiv Bild, by Wikipedia user Greenshed, licensed by Creative Commons

Time to plug the leak?

More than a few years ago, the term “phone-mining” probably meant nothing to anyone.  Nowadays, it has become one of the most controversial topics all over the United States, including our federal courts.  A recent ruling states that the acquisition of data through mobile phones, including cell phone numbers and and timestamps, is unconstitutional. The case itself, Klayman v. Obama (13-cv-881), was heard in Washington D.C. under Judge Richard Leon.  This private collection of data was leaked by former NSA contractor and controversial figure Edward Snowden, who is currently living in Russia under temporary asylum. Read more

Blacklisted? Investors Rally Against Blackberry

Blackberry bowl, by flickr user ftchris, licensed by Creative Commons.

Sweet or sour?

Blackberry’s tough times continue as their shareholders cry foul.  In a recent class-action lawsuit, thousands of investors claim that they were misled by the company’s lofty sales expectations.  Many are complaining that the company failed to compete with industry leaders Google and Apple (let alone Microsoft). The lawsuit includes a number of those who bought stock in Blackberry over the past calendar year.  Unhappy campers are furious that they mistakenly placed their faith in the wrong smartphone/technology movement and are seeking damages.  Read more