Up in Smoke: NY Sues UPS Over Cigarette Tax

Cigarette, by flickr user Justin Shearer, licensed by Creative Commons.

Where There’s Smoke, There’s Fire.

The latest courtroom battle about cigarettes has nothing to do with damaged lungs, but rather a hole in the wallet. It recently came to light that shipping giant UPS failed to properly adhere to tax laws in New York City and State. This has resulted in 78,500 shipments of untaxed cigarettes being transported in and out of New York for about 4 years. UPS has denied these allegations, citing their past experience in the shipping industry and adherence to any and all state laws. The lawsuit was filed in New York by Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Counsel Zachary Carter and is seeking about $180M in damages. Outright accusations of lying and cheating have been thrown out by both sides, understandable considering the hefty price tag attached. Read more

Offside: Lawyer Sued While Buying Soccer Club

FIFA world cup 2006 - Rome circus maximus flag, by Wikipedia user Alejo2083, licensed by Creative Commons.

Golazo, or no-lazo?

Although Italian sports have a reputation for being less-than-upfront, this time the trouble is being caused in America. Joe Tacopina, the rockstar lawyer who has represented the likes of Alex Rodriguez, is being sued by a former client at a very inconvenient time. Tacopina recently arrived in Bologna, Italy and is entering the final stages of purchasing the soccer club Blogona F.C. 1909, known as Bologna. According to reports, the lawsuit was filed with the intention to freeze Mr. Tacopina’s assets while he is abroad and looking to become a part owner of the franchise. The suit also claims the plaintiff was misled by the defendant, who was searching for representation in Connecticut (Mr. Tacopina is not registered to practice law in that state). The suit was officially filed in New York City. Read more

Jury Settles New Case of Candy Crush

Mixed Candy Macro World Refugee Day Garfield Park and Crippled Squirrel June 24, 20117 by flickr user stevendepolo, licensed by Creative Commons.

Sweet or sour?

When Candy Crush is being mentioned, insistently everyone’s thinking about the addicting puzzle game. No one would ever come to a conclusion of candy literally crushing you. Beth Flickinger experienced 25 pounds of M&Ms piling on top of her head due to the malfunction of the candy dispenser and had filed a personal injury lawsuit. Flickinger’s only motivation during the accident was to catch the dispenser so it did not harm her two kids that were with her at Toys R Us, located in New York City’s Time Square. She was successful in protecting her kids, but the 42-year-old claims she suffered severe headaches, twisting her neck causing a herniated disk, loss of income, and apparently affected her sex life.  Read more

Achtung Spidey! Broadway Lawsuit Set for Court

Bono as the Fly Cleveland 1992, by Wikimedia user Steve Kalinsky, licensed by Creative Commons

“I have run, I have crawled, I have scaled these city walls…”

Spider-Man has always been much more familiar with spandex suits than lawsuits.  The Broadway play ‘Turn Off the Dark’ is slinging across headlines after the old co-writer and musical director Julie Taymor is suing over copyright infringement.  She is seeking compensation up to $1 million after being terminated after the show suffered from freak injuries and other mishaps.  It was believed that a decision could be reached, however sources claim the final stumbling block was creative control over Marvel’s web-head himself.  U2’s Bono and The Edge, who are the show’s composers, are also set to appear for the court date in New York, officially set for May 28. Read more

Bad Reception: Web-TV Service Avoids Lawsuit

antenna home roof watch tv sky send transmitter by, Pixabay user Hans, licensed by Creative Commons.

Hello, is there anybody in there?

There seems to be a buzz in the air around New York City recently and cable/satellite providers aren’t happy about it.  The internet-powered television service, Aereo, allows users to enjoy basic programs for an incredibly small cost and has thrived despite a growing number of lawsuits.  Companies such as Cablevision contend that this alternative to their offerings violates certain copyrights and contracts.  Aereo argues that since their units include small antennas, the analog signal they pick up is free over the airwaves and not breaking any laws.  Aereo, which is backed by media executive Barry Diller, plans to grow their service area over the next few months including major cities such as Washington D.C., Boston, and Chicago. Read more