Businesses Still Recovering From Superstorm

Fish Plate, by wikipedia user Jastrow, licensed by Creative Commons

Seems a little fishy

Years ago, Hurricane Sandy struck everywhere on the East Coast of the US, from Florida all the way to Maine. Many homes, companies, and families were uprooted, including vacation spots along the cost and even in New York City. A Greek restaurant in the TriBeCa district called Thalassa has recently filed a lawsuit against their insurance provider, who denied their claim that the storm disrupted their business. A main substation in downtown Manhattan, powered by a company called Con Edison, experienced problems due to the surging waters. The Phoenix Insurance Co. states that although the business was closed for 11 days, Thalassa’s insurance does not cover this kind of disruption. Read more

Core Firm in Settlement Wants Their Share of Apple Pie

Apple Pie, by Flickr user "Kanko", licensed via Creative Commons.We recently wrote about how a Chinese tech company won a settlement against Apple to the tune of $60 million over its iPad trademark. However, when it comes to paying the law firm that helped them earn that paycheck, Proview seems to be skipping out on the bill. The Grandall Law Firm is suing for their agreed-upon share of the settlement, which comes out to $2.4 million. Proview founder Yang Rongshan has been quoted as saying the complaints by the firm are “nonsense” and has insisted that they will be paying the bill eventually. The company itself is rumored to be in the process of liquidation due to impending bankruptcy, lending some insight to Grandall Law’s insistence on being paid as soon as possible.  Read more

Illinois Law Firm Agrees to Reimburse Scammed Customers

Debt, by Flickr user "iandavid", licensed via Creative Commons.Legal Helpers Debt Resolution, an Illinois company claiming to lower its customers’ debt interest rates, agreed to reimburse customers who paid for the company’s services in advance and yet did not receive any debt consolidation.  The company will have to pay a reported $2.1 million in a settlement with the state.  By law, debt consolidation companies are not allowed to charge an up-front fee.  Instead, a firm can only make money once they’ve actually reduced a customer’s interest rate or otherwise negotiated a reduced debt load.  Usually, this means making a contract for a certain percentage of whatever the deduction turns out to be.  This a necessary protection, as otherwise consumers can be duped into paying for a service that provides no actual benefit.  Only truly determined scum would then be able to take advantage of struggling families.  So how did Legal Helpers Debt Resolution get around this?

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