Settlement For Alzheimer’s Patent

FDG-PET_brain_scan-normal-MCI-Alzheimers

“Alzheimer’s is the cleverest thief, because she not only steals from you, but she steals the very thing you need to remember what’s been stolen. 
”
― Jarod Kintz.

In the pharmaceutical world, there is always a new drug or treatment to cure, suspend growth of, or prevent a disease/illness. Just like any other business, the competition is steep and each company is trying to produce “the cure.” Recently, Eli Lilly & Company and Johnson & Johnson both have been in the process of developing potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, that gets worse as it progresses which eventually leads to death. In April, Eli Lilly & Co sought to revoke a patent held by J&J in London courts, which was recently settled with Eli Lilly & Co as victor for the patent. “We are disappointed by the outcome of this case, and we are considering our options,” Greg Panico, a U.S. spokesman for Janssen.

J&J’s study failed in phase III for Solanezumab. Solanezumab is a monoclonal antibody being investigated as a neuroprotector for patients with Alzheimer’s disease. While Lilly is going back to the drawing board to follow up on a signal it tracked, they are referencing one study where its’ drug had an impact on cognition in early-stage patients. Eli Lilly stated that they are “focused on discovering and developing innovative medicines to meet the needs of patients. This decision by the court supports that effort.”

According to a report that was done last year by Deutche Bank AG, the companies that are developing the first treatment for Alzheimer are competing for a market that might be well over $20 billion. Both companies’ treatments target the build-up of plaque in a patients’ brains that is linked to the disease. Since 1998, there has been over 101 clinical trials that have failed, according to the Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America. Alzheimer’s is expected to affect millions of people worldwide by 2030, per certain pharmaceutical companies.

One comment on “Settlement For Alzheimer’s Patent

  1. What are we the people, as a whole, coming to? When those who write articles that are in the limelight of legal knowledge (e.g. Deanna Zabawa, author of the “Settlement for Alzheimer’s Patent”) don’t bother to spell check their work. I, personally, find it confusing and disappointing that one depends on spell check and/or feels they are such a great writer, that to bother checking their own work is unthinkable. Worse yet, someone has to read it before allowing it to go “live”.

    While I understand that this blog entry was naming Eli Lilly & Co. as well as Johnson & Johnson, who is Janssen? I know it reads that “Greg Panico, a U.S. spokesman for Janssen”, but who is Janssen and where are they listed in the article? Or are we to be donkeys and ASSuME it’s Johnson & Johnson, because of one’s lackadaisical skills?

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