Hearing to Follow What He Heard at School

old school

Finally Taking a Stand

With bullying awareness on the rise in our nation, many students and families are trying to take a stand. A young student at South Fayette High School finally had enough when he decided to record bullying incidents directed at him during class. Using an iPad, the boy made an audio recording of the attacks to use as evidence in his case. The 15-year old boy alleged that he had been harassed daily for several months before finally making the iPad recording. Shea Love, the boy’s mother, told reporters that “they were calling him some really bad names, talking about pulling his pants down” (WPXI, 2014). Despite these allegations, the young boy who made the recordings was eventually charged with disorderly conduct, had to pay fines, and was forced to delete the recording. In response to these charges from South Fayette District Judge Maureen McGraw-Desmet, the family hired an attorney and they are filing a civil suit.

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Think Before You Post

Judges Gavel, by Wikipedia user Chris Potter, licensed by Creative Commons.

Bringing Down The Gavel

In case you needed one, here’s another reason to be careful about what you post on Facebook. An age discrimination case that originates back to 2010 between Patrick Snay and the Miami-based Gulliver Preparatory School began when “Gulliver declined to renew Snay’s contract following years of employment” (Smiley, Miami Herald, 2014). The case took a surprising turn when Mr. Snay’s daughter, Dana Snay posted an antagonistic comment on Facebook. The comment, which was seen by Dana Snay’s approximately 1,200 Facebook friends, stated “Mama and Papa Snay won the case against Gulliver. Gulliver is now officially paying for my vacation to Europe this summer. SUCK IT” (Stucker, CNN, 2014). Unfortunately for the Snays, Dana’s comment was posted just days before the deal was set to be finalized.

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Father Sues Track Team After Son is Excluded

Decorative Scales of Justice in the Courtroom

Decisions

This lawsuit gives a new meaning to the phrase “Speed kills”. A father in New Jersey has sued his son’s school for kicking him off of the track team. Mawusimensah Mears, who ran track for Sterling Regional High School in Camden County, had reportedly been skipping out on practice after his coaches left him on the bench. The boy’s father, Ervin Mears Jr, goes as far as to claim that his was being ridiculed by his teammates for being faster than them. The younger Mears had also missed practice due to an injury and a death in the family. The father is seeking damages up to $40 million against the school, track coach, and principal, among other parties. Read more

Are Unpaid Internships Legal?

office desk by Flickr user Sean MacEntee, licensed by Creative Commons

                       Looks about right

Internships offer college students and recent graduates a valuable way to gain experience in their fields of study. Regardless of how educational internships may be, they can be incredibly frustrating if they require the students to work for free.

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