Late Apology for Late Show Lawsuit

Quill, by flickr user sure2talk, licensed by Creative Commons.

“My bad.”

A former intern who sued David Letterman is now apologizing for the lawsuit, saying lawyers forced her into the idea. In an apology letter sent to New York’s Daily News, Mallory Musallam expresses regret over suing The Late Show over unpaid wages. The intern, backed by similar employees dating back to 2008, had filed suit against Worldwide Pants, the force behind CBS’s popular late night television program. Musallam went as far as to claim that she had been treated like a “indentured servant” by Letterman and the staff at The Late Show. The suit was originally filed years ago in the New York Supreme Court, amongst a heard of other lawsuits involving unpaid interns.

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Two Settlements for Families of Mentally Ill Killed by Police Errors

Some riot police, by Flickr user "Charles de Jesus", licensed via Creative Commons.

Yesterday, a couple of similar settlements were reached concerning cases where undue police violence against innocent mentally ill citizens led to death.  Read on to find out the details.

 

 

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Texas Educators Ordered to Apologize Post-Settlement

Graduation prayer, licensed via photos.com
Church + State, perniciously entwined.

Apparently civility is the kind of thing that needs to be enforced by a court.  A few weeks after a settlement banning school administrators in Texas from promoting religious displays, U.S. District Judge Fred Biery issued an order forcing certain school employees to apologize to the plaintiffs in the settled case.  The settlement included a term forbidding administrators and employees from “disparaging” the plaintiff’s family, some agnostics who had objected the the promotion of prayer in a San Antonio graduation ceremony.  The superintendent of the school district then nearly immediately disparaged the plaintiff’s family in a televised interview, not deigning to wait even a few hours after the settlement was reached.  Later, the director of the high school marching band accused the plaintiffs of “lies and false accusations” on Facebook, a statement that could be construed as slander, should the plaintiff be able to prove that she is not a liar.

Judge Biery then issued a “Non-Kumbaya” order, essentially claiming that the defendants in the case need not be perfect friends with the plaintiffs, holding hands and singing “Kumbaya” together and whatnot, but that they must at least be publicly amicable and civil.  The order required two signed documents within ten days: one noting that the defendants have apologized for their outbursts, and one noting that the plaintiffs have accepted the apology.  In his order, Judge Biery stressed that “silence is golden”, and that some people, such as Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton, have paid a price for “talking too much”.

It’s a sad state of affairs when a judge has to step in to force someone to be graceful and reverent by order of the court.  Makes it hard to believe that Coach Taylor could train such stand up players in an environment full of sore losers.