Fantasy Sports Headed Back to Reality

Monument Valley, by pixabay user mstodt, licensed by Creative Commons.

Even the Wild West didn’t stay wild forever

Those who have been dreaming of making money in daily fantasy sports may be in for a rude awakening. A class-action lawsuit has been filed against the 2 major players in the industry, DraftKings and FanDuel, questioning the self-regulatory methods of their contests. The recent scandal has shades of insider trading, where employees from each company would take the internal information (including player rankings, strategy, etc) and submit “teams” to the opposing company. Both companies have been advertising heavily with popular sports leagues like the NFL and MLB, leading many to believe they are very financially successful. The latest lawsuit was filed by a man from Watertown, MA (DraftKings is based in Boston, while FanDuel is based in New York City). Read More

Brady vs. NFL Lawsuit Full of Hot Air

Football field, by flickir user nightthree, licensed by Creative Commons.

Ball so hard

The saga of deflated footballs and a certain A-list quarterback have not left headlines since the winter of 2014. Now, months later, we are all following the twists and turns of the story, including NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell’s attempt to keep Tom Brady off the field in September. This seemed to be the final straw for Brady and Patriots Owner Robert Kraft to fire back at Goodell and the NFL, opting for a New York courtroom over the sunny, green fields of Foxborough, MA. There are several undertones here, including the NFL Players Association’s potential second thoughts about granting Goodell his current power, plus the Commissioner’s personal relationship with Kraft. How did letting air out of a football lead to a corporate showdown and legal dispute, centered around a high profile athlete? Read more

Mayweather-Pacquiao Promoters Get Jabbed

Faded Glory, by flickr user Bryan Furnance, licensed by Creative Commons.

Jab, Cross, Hook

The sport of boxing has not had much of an impact on pop culture or news headlines in the past 20 years, and the latest event may have put the sport down for the count. The heavily-promoted match between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao has come under serious criticism for how uneventful and expensive it was, and now people are calling their lawyers. Multiple class-action lawsuits have been filed against all parties involved, especially the promoters of the fight itself. The pay-per-view main event charged $99 per household, with Mayweather winning in unexciting fashion; however it was revealed after the match that Pacquiao had a pretty serious shoulder injury. Plaintiff’s claim that they were duped into paying for the fight regardless of the promoters’ knowledge of the injury, choosing to “go on with the show” due to the massive amounts of money each company pulled in from advertising.

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Takeda Pharmaceutical to Pay Up Big Time


Read the fine print

Japan’s largest pharmaceutical drug maker will be paying a hefty lawsuit, ranging anywhere from 2.4 -2.7 billion dollars.  Takeda Pharmaceutical’s drug “Actos” has apparently contributed to the development of bladder cancer in many US. patients.  The plaintiffs in this case have alleged that Takeda Pharmaceutical did not properly warn individuals of the associated risks of taking this drug.  Takeda’s stance on the issue is that they are standing behind their product because they beleive that the benefits outweigh the risks.  This is a tough “pill to swallow” , because it posits that they are okay with loss of life or the potential for furthering a very dangerous disease, as long as it helps more people than it hurts.

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Claim on the Caribbean

Pirate Flag


In a shocking lawsuit, an author claimed that Disney stole his idea in their film, Pirates of the Caribbean. In the film, the pirates transform into living skeletons under moonlight. This author failed at attempting to make billions when a federal judge ruled in Disney’s favor. Royce Matthew, the plaintiff in this suit, has failed several times in lawsuits regarding the wildly successful Pirates of the Caribbean films. His first lawsuit attempt dates back to 2005, promptly followed by a second attempt in 2006. The 2006 lawsuit was quelled when Disney revealed old “theme park art” that dated far beyond Royce Matthew’s claims. This art proved that Disney independently put forth the idea of “unique supernatural elements”. After this event, Matthew signed a release form.

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