Things Get Stranger: Man Sues Netflix

Thunderstorm, by flickr user Thomas Bresson, licensed by Creative Commons.

There’s a storm coming

Netflix has had tons of success in the last few years, rising from the ashes to become a technology powerhouse. The business model is a low cost, subscription-based service providing content to consumers who love their tv shows and movies. One of the most successful pieces of original content is the Netflix-original Stranger Things, a sci-fi / fantasy series about kids in the 1980s who experience (you guessed it) “strange things”. Even stranger is that the now famous images used to promote the show, which an ominous thunderstorm system moving through the clouds, allegedly infringes on a Montana photographer’s copyright. As such, he is taking Netflix to court and seeking damages regarding this misuse of his image. Read more

The End of the Secondary Marketplace?

"US Supreme Court" by flickr user dbking licensed under Creative Commons
“Supreme” Court?

 

It’s that time of year again when the United States Supreme Court unveils its agenda for the year season. One interesting case to make sure to watch for is Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons.  The case deals with the first-sale doctrine.  A precedent established by the Supreme Court since 1908 that acknowledges compete ownership of a product by the consumer after the first purchase.  This case all started with college textbooks, an expense all college students are aware of. An international student, Supap Kirstaeng, told his family back in Thailand to buy his textbooks on the international market.  He got them for a huge discount and shipped them to him privately.  Currently, international textbooks are not allowed to be sold in the United States.  After Mr. Kirstaeng read the books, he sold them in the US.  The textbook company filed suit and the controversy has made its way up to the Supreme Court.

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