Bitcoin: Getting Cryptic with Coinbase

bitcoin, by pixabay user MichaelWuensch, licensed by Creative Commons.

Coinbase off base?

The world of bitcoin and cryptocurrency is very… well, cryptic. The exchanging of “internet money” with fluid values that rise and fall is reminiscent of the stock market, without any government regulation. As more people learn what crypto is and how it works, there are going to be players that become the gold standard in the space. Unfortunately, there are also going be people who can find ways to profit from it. With no one to regulate what goes on, would it be possible for a “CEO” from a crypto startup to steal money from his own clients? This is the latest issue with the most popular cryptocurrency exchange platform, Coinbase, which is being sued after they failed to raise alarms about a money laundering scheme. The case is now going to a jury trial after the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals denied an appeal in district court. Read more

Fishy Decision for Miami’s Marlins

White Marlin in North Caorlina, by flickr user Dominic Sherony, licensed by Creative Commons.

Gone Fishin’

The beauty of sportsmanship is trying to out-perform and out-think the competition. A baseball team based in Florida is now trying to claim that, legally, their ownership group is based in the British Virgin Islands. This would mean that any governance by the United States or Florida would not have jurisdiction, and any decisions would have to be filed in Island nation. This would also take a recent lawsuit brought against the Miami Marlins and their former owner, Jeffrey Loria, and essentially throw it overboard. Miami-Dade County and the city of Miami itself are seeking compensation after Loria allegedly over-promised, under-delivered, than sold the Major League Baseball franchise for $1.2 billion. Read More

Trouble Brewing for Starbucks

coffee steam 1, by flickr user waferboard, licensed by Creative Commons.

Totally worth the risk.

Studies have shown that up to 2 cups of black coffee per day can have a positive effect on the human body. Well, those days may be over. A non-for-profit group in California has filed a lawsuit against a number of coffee companies, including Starbucks, about health warnings on all products solid within the state. A little known chemical in coffee, acrylamide, can apparently cause cancer. Acrylamide is created during the brewing process when coffee beans are roasted. Though many experts agree that the actual risk of getting cancer from coffee is incredibly low, a judge ruled that Starbucks (among other companies) failed to include any type of warning or information of risk on cups of coffee sold. Read More

BlackBerry Sends Facebook a Lawsuit Request

BlackBerry email on the BB 8330, by flickr user Ian Lamont, licensed by Creative Commons.

‘member these?

In the ever-changing world of technology and information, it is sometimes easy to forget the trailblazers. BlackBerry, one of the first companies to consistently release top of the line smartphones, is now going to mat against the social media juggernaut Facebook. Claiming patent infringement related to messaging platforms and mobile apps, BlackBerry is seeking monetary damages of an undisclosed amount. Interestingly enough, BlackBerry recently went after Nokia for similar issues. Instagram and WhatsApp (owned by Facebook) were also named in the lawsuit. This could be seen as Blackberry trying to remind the public and their competitors who the “old guard” in mobile technology & messaging really is. Read More

No California Love for NFL’s Rams

rams by pixabay user PublicDomainPictures / 18042 images, licensed by creative commons.

Feeling sheepish

The National Football League is no stranger to off the field issues, and it looks like they’re going back to the courtroom. The City of St. Louis claims that the Rams, who have moved from Missouri to Los Angeles, have violated their own “relocation guidelines”. A group of about 100 plaintiffs is upset about how the Rams went about the process and are looking for their pound of flesh. Not only was the football franchise named, but also the NFL itself, plus it’s 32 league owners. St. Louis Circuit Court Judge Christopher McGraugh ruled that the lawsuit would not be dismissed or brought to arbitration, which is a win for the football fans in the mid-west. Ironically, the Rams have returned to prominence since going back to Los Angeles, on the strength of top draft pick Todd Gurley and 31-year-old head coach Sean McVay. Read More