Tabloid Troubles

Invasion of privacy continues

Although there is no question that the lives of the royal family have been the subjects of tabloid gossip over the years, the law prohibits an opportunity for legal action well after the incident. Specifically in this recent case, Prince Harry has attempted to file a lawsuit against a news outlet for events that took place from January 1996 to December 2010. Involving personal conversations and exchanges between friends, an ex-girlfriend, and palace aides, Prince Harry accuses News of the World and The Sun of engaging in hacking activities. The problem is that the former tabloid ceased publication in July 2011 and the latter publication denies all accusations or participation. Read more

Motel 10 Million

Privacy scandal

According to court documents, for over two and a half years, Motel 6 employees provided guest information to Immigration and Customers Enforcement agents.  With the information provided, officers screened anyone listed with a Hispanic-sounding last name.  Some of the identifiers obtained include license plate numbers, full names, birthdays, and room numbers.  While some individuals were simply “looked into,” others were detained or arrested. These guest lists were willingly handed over without warrants or subpoenas.  As a result, the civil rights activist group Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed a class action lawsuit in January 2018. Read more

Settlement News in the Entertainment Business

Spin me round

The entertainment world has recently reached a few settlements, and brought some old ones back up for new litigation.

  • A settlement has finally been reached in the Michael Jackson secret recording case. In 2003, as Michael Jackson flew to Santa Barbara, California to turn himself in on child molestation charges, the jet company he hired conspired to record the pop singer and his lawyers.  Shortly thereafter, Jeffrey Borer of XtraJet attempted to sell the video to media outlets in the ensuing media frenzy of that particular trial.  Not exactly the machinations of a smooth criminal, here.  Now, nearly a decade later, Jackson’s attorneys have reached a $750,000 settlement with the now-defunct company, meaning Borer will never have to go to trial for invasion of privacy.

Click here to read two more settlements after the jump: