Lawsuit to Teach a Lesson

Eliminating a monopoly

College tuition and housing is expensive enough.  But how much are textbooks?  While students may be fully aware of the cost of their education and living on campus before they commit to a particular school, they are not initially provided a breakdown of the price of their course material, per class, per semester. About ten years ago, e-books were only being introduced as a mainstream method of studying.  You could still find most students walking around campus with heavy textbooks.  Since then, textbook sales have decreased, and students are electing to bypass print in order to study material entirely online.  Despite the shift in preference, the textbook market is allegedly depleting options for obtaining needed course material.    Read more

Streaming a Settlement

Students hear good news

The National Association of the Deaf did not remain silent when online video lectures posted for programs through Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology did not include captions or subtitles.  Those who are hard of hearing were not capable of learning from online educational material.  Given the public forum of the posted videos, the subject was considered a federal issue. While the videos were open to any individuals who had access to the internet, not everyone was able to learn from the resources provided.  The 2015 lawsuit has finally seen resolution. Read more

Admission into a College Indictment

Collegiate catastrophe

Dedicated students and athletes commit a majority of their young academic lives to preparing for college. That college diploma, as well as the university listed on their resumes, will play a huge factor into how the rest of their lives will unfold. One would hope the application process is fair and admission would only be granted to the most qualified students. However, when politics and money are involved, fair is not always the winning adjective. Read more

New Jersey Teen Sues Parents For Funds

Caution: Teenagers

Kids these days…

Rachel Canning is one of the most talked about teens in the country as of late. This Lincoln Park, NJ resident is suing her parents, “accusing them of tossing her out of the family home when she turned 18 and refusing to pay for her private high school and college education”. The lawsuit filed is demanding that Rachel’s parents not only fund her college education, but also her current private high school tuition, living expenses, and also her legal fees. Rachel claims that she is an honor student and a cheerleader, who could potentially lose her opportunity to attend college after being cut off from her family. However, her parents tell a different tale; they state Rachel was not kicked out, but left willingly because she did not want to abide by their rules. Read More

B-E Aggressive, But Don’t Consider It A Sport

Cheerleading: Bad for your budget, but great for your calves.

Cheerleading: Bad for your budget, but great for your calves.

A 2009 gender discrimination lawsuit filed by the Quinnipiac University Women’s Volleyball coach against the school has recently been settled. The settlement is of particular interest in athletic departments across the nation as it offers a solution to a frequently-had debate in the sports world: Is Cheerleading a sport? In an attempt to eliminate Quinnipiac’s volleyball program altogether, the school had intimated that sufficient resources had instead been allotted to competitive cheer and that they were therefore compliant under the guidelines of Title IX. Read more