Spider-Man Swings to Supreme Court

spider web, by flickr user cybershot dude, licensed by Creative Commons

Trapped in a web

If you are a child during the holiday season, there may be no better gift than a brand new Spider-Man toy. However, it appears that a trademark lawsuit may keep some Marvel merchandise off the shelves. A man named Stephen Kimble invented a toy glove that fires silly string, allowing kids to pretend they are the web-slinging hero Spider-Man. Marvel bought the idea and had been paying Kimble royalties from sales, until his patent on the idea ran out. Furious, the inventor filed a lawsuit to overturn a 50-year-old Supreme Court ruling about expiring patents, seemingly forcing Spider-Man to trade in his red-and-blue spandex for a suit and tie. Read more

Traffic Light Lawsuit in Chicago Stopped Short

Lower Wacker Drive, by flickr user Paul Sableman, licensed by Creative Commons

Stop! Hey, what’s that sound?

Aggressive drivers would be the first to tell you that traffic cameras are a major inconvenience. A recent class-action lawsuit was filed Chicago, contesting tickets given to motorists who had been caught running red lights. The lawsuit reached the Illinois Supreme Court before being struck down. The city had always stood behind the right to enforce these traffic laws under a “homefield advantage” policy, and eventually filed an ordinance in 2006. The class-action suit was aimed to dispute any traffic tickets given between 2003-2006. Read more

Class Action: Galaxy of Interns Gets a Guardian

Spiral Galaxy NGC 1376, by flickr user Hubble Heritage, licensed by Creative Commons.

Employment Lawyers, Assemble!

While the stars are aligning for Marvel at the box office, it appears that one former employee is trying to become the First Avenger. Kenneth Jackson, who worked for the company for part of 2008, recently filed a class action lawsuit and is seeking lost wages and back pay. Jackson was reportedly classified as an “intern”, although he worked full 40 hour-per-week shifts Monday through Friday for the better part of 5 months. Along with Mr. Jackson are 100 other Marvel interns seeking compensation. The lawsuit was filed in New York’s Supreme Court.

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When Miranda Rights Are Required

arrest in chicago by Flickr user  grendelkhan, licensed by Creative Commons

          He has the right to remain silent

The Miranda Warning, commonly referred to as Miranda Rights, is something you are probably familiar with due to various movies and TV shows. Although the Supreme Court does not stipulate an exact wording of these rights, law enforcement agencies have determined a fundamental set of statements to be read to accused persons before they can be questioned.

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Police K-9 Searches Coming to a Neighborhood Near You

"Prescott Valley Police Dept. K-9 Units" by Flickr User VPI Licensed Under Creative Commons

Knock, Knock. Who’s there?

Imagine you are sitting in your home enjoying some television when all of a sudden you see a group of policemen stroll down the street with a K-9 unit.  This specialized drug hunter barks in the direction of your house indicating there may be illegal substances in your dwelling.  The police have the right to break down the door and search your home because that may now be considered probable cause.  The United States Supreme Court heard two cases back to backFlorida v. Jardines and Florida v. Harris,  that will decide just that.

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