Battle Lines Drawn Over World War II Statue

Marines Memorial, by flickr user Jim Bowen, licensed by Creative Commons.

Healing Old Wounds

Residents of Southern California have filed a lawsuit against the city of Glendale over a controversial World War II statue. The $30,000 “Comfort Women” memorial is in honor of those Chinese and Korean women who were allegedly forced into prostitution by Imperial Japan in the 1930′s and 1940′s. The plaintiffs claim that the city is violating the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution, which is also referred to as “the law of the land”. Supporters of the statue are active in spreading word about the comfort women issue, while the Japanese government has never officially apologized on the record. While no dollar amount has been mentioned, many believe the plaintiffs are strictly interested in removing the statue altogether. Read more

Class-Action: Unpaid Interns Change Their Tune

The Library of Birmingham - signs - Construction Site - Keep Out, by flickr user Elliot Brown, licensed by Creative Commons

Men at work (…for free)

The days of unpaid internships might finally be coming to an end. In what many see as the next chip to fall, Warner Music Group and Atlantic Records are being sued by former interns who were uncommonly compensated for their time at the group. Justin Henry, who worked for Atlantic from 2007-2008, represents the class action lawsuit filed in the state of New York, claiming he was improperly classified as an unpaid intern. Federal labor laws state that Henry was technically an employee and would have him at least making minimum-wage. Interns in this field often worked from 10am-6pm and were sometimes asked to stay later, yet they never received proper compensation. Read more

The Largest Drug-safety Settlement to Date

Pills Money

Labeled by the U.S. Government as the largest drug-safety settlement to date with a generic drug manufacturer; Ranbaxy Laboratories has just pled guilty to three felony counts under the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic act, and four felony counts of of providing false statements to the United States Food and Drug Administration.

The company failed to conduct proper safety and quality tests of several drugs that were manufactured in the Indian plants. These generic drugs were manufactured in Paonta Sahib, and Dewas India. The major drugs involved in this case were the generic versions of Gabapentin, Sotret, and Ciprofloxacin. This is a great cause for concern because compared to the plants in the United States which are inspected by the F.D.A. once every two years, plants over seas are inspected about once every seven to thirteen years. It has been proven between June and August of 2007, certain batches of medications had tested positive for “unknown impurities” and had unreliable shelf lives. Ranbaxy waited two months until October of that year to report these impurities.

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Bieber Fever: Star Named in Copyright Lawsuit

music notes 3 by flickr user emilyamimu, licensed by Creative Commons

You said you would always be mine

Just like the common cold, pretty much everyone has had Bieber fever, but apparently people are immune to the epidemic. Two songwriters, Devin Copeland and Mareio Overton, filed a complaint in U.S. District Court in Virginia against the pop star. Justin Beiber and Usher are facing a $10 million lawsuit for supposedly stealing song “Somebody to Love.” Back in 2009, Copeland and Overton claim that “Somebody To Love” was presented to Usher and Jonetta Patton, Usher’s mother, who also plays the role of his manager from time to time, by music scouts. They state that copy was never returned and that they never heard back from Jonetta or anyone associated with the company. Read more

Apple and Amazon Urged to Reach Settlement

Fifth Avenue Cube - Apple Store, by flickr user Rob Boudon, licensed by Creative Commons.

                 Think outside the box

Think of this as a teaser for a heavyweight match that will take place in a few months.  A judge has ordered that Apple and Amazon attempt to reach a settlement over use of the word “Appstore” before their big court date in the summer.  Apple, the technology giant, claims that they own rights to the phrase and had already sued the e-commerce site Amazon.com.  A judge had ruled that Apple had no claim to the fictional phrase.  U.S. Magistrate Judge Elizabeth Laporte has urged the two companies to gather this spring in attempts to avoid a later clash over the intellectual property, copyrights, or trademarks.  If no settlement is reached, Apple and Amazon will soon go before a judge in Southern California over using “Appstore”. Read more