Fake Meth Leaves Orlando Man in a Crumby Situation

A delicious crime

The misconception that an individual is a criminal if accused of a crime comes at a cost to those who never even committed the crime. In late 2015, Orlando resident, Daniel Rushing, was pulled over for speeding and failing to make a complete stop. While he was guilty of violating these traffic laws, he was wrongfully accused of a more severe offense. As a result of a drastic misunderstanding, Rushing was awarded $37,500 in a lawsuit against the city of Orlando.

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Police Brutality Lawsuit Reaches Settlement

New Orleans Police Department squad car at New Orleans Pride, by flickr user Tony Webster, licensed by Creative Commons.

“It’s hard to be a saint in the city”

An 11-year dispute finally reached a resolution in the amount of $13.3 million. The lawsuit against the city of New Orleans was filed in the days following Hurricane Katrina. Seventeen plaintiffs in the suit brought allegations against the city, claiming it was responsible for “wrongful deaths and injuries, deprivation of civil rights and lost wages caused by instances of police brutality.” The three major complaints referenced in the lawsuit include a police-related shooting, resulting in the amputation of one woman’s arm and the deaths of two men on the Danziger Bridge; the cover-up of the shooting of a gentleman named Henry Glover; and the beating and death of a gentleman named Raymond Robair, by a police officer. Read More

LAPD Officers Settle Discrimination Lawsuit

Decorative Scales of Justice in the Courtroom

Courtroom

Recently, a decision has been made about an incident involving two Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) officers suing the department for discrimination because they are Latino. Officers Allan Corrales and George Diego were awarded near $4 million combined in their discrimination suit against the department. Both officers are Latino and were involved in a fatal shooting in 2010 killing an unarmed, autistic African American man, Eugene Washington.

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Sparkling Water Bubbles Up Controversy

Decorative Scales of Justice in the Courtroom

Courtroom

Elizabeth Daly, a student at the University of Virginia says she fled in terror when several undercover officers aggressively swarmed her vehicle after leaving a local supermarket. The officers thought she had illegally purchased beer which they later found out was sparkling water they had mistaken for beer. Ms. Daly was in her car with several friends when plainclothes agents surrounded the vehicle and began banging on the windows ordering her to roll the windows down. After one of the agents drew his gun and another jumped on the hood of the car, Elizabeth said she panicked and was unsure if the officers were indeed law enforcement agents. Ms. Daly panicked and fled the scene in complete fear, grazing two of the agents.
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Is It Legal To Film Police?

Decorative Scales of Justice in the Courtroom

Courtroom

I’m sure everyone can remember a YouTube video of police brutality or an invasive TSA pat-down that made them cringe. Imagine all of the encounters that never make it to the internet.  Those moments are only made public because of someone exercises their First Amendment right.

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