Legalized Sports Gambling Strikes Out, For Now

Las Vegas sportsbook, by wikipedia user Baishampayan Ghos, licensed by Creative Commons

There’s No Place Like Home

The NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL were quick to remind New Jersey that there’s no such thing as a safe bet. The major professional sports leagues have filed a lawsuit against a recently passed law that had the hopes of on-site legalized sports gambling. Currently, the only place in the United States where you can place a live bet on pro sports is Las Vegas, but NJ Governor Chris Christie has other ideas in mind. Monmouth Park, a racetrack in South Jersey, was on the verge of being able to accept bets for NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, and NCAA games before the lawsuit was filed. The federal court quickly agreed with the sports leagues, and now New Jersey will have to find an alternative route to taking legal sports bets.

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Traffic Trouble: Lawsuit Filed Against NJ Gov

George_Washingtin_Bridge, by Wikipedia User Dave Freider, licensed by Creative Commons.

Water Under the Bridge?

Any commuter in the tri-state area is well aware of how much of a pain the George Washington Bridge can be.  Frustrated people stuck in traffic will often wonder why there is construction or delays at a certain time.  Now, it appears they have an answer.  New Jersey Governor Chris Christie’s administration is coming under fire due to a controversial lane closure situation with political ties.  A federal investigation into the matter has opened up, which also sparked a number of residents to file suit against their own state leader.  Christie, who had previously been seen as a hardball, no-nonsense politician, is now at the center of a major controversy. Read More

Game Over for Software Store’s Re-Selling

UHHH, by photobucket user BRcouncil, licensed by Creative Commons

A Professional Headshot.

It appears that a popular video game retailer is playing some games of their own.  GameStop (NYSE: GME), whose headquarters is in Grapevine TX, has been named in a class-action lawsuit in regards to the selling of used video games without including all of the downloadable content, or DLC.  When purchasing a new video game, a special unique keycode is included that allows the purchaser access to new features, such as new weapons, enhanced features, or updated rosters.  The class-action states that since anyone who buys a used game does not have access to the keycode, and GameStop does not strictly state this, they are in violation of the Consumer Fraud Act. The suit was filed in New Jersey as each plaintiff is seeking about $10-$15 per game in locations across the state from Fall 2010 to Summer 2012. Read more

Restaurant Builds a Noise Wall as Part of Settlement

Golfers, by Flickr user "spunkinator", licensed via Creative Commons.A rambunctious party crew looking to incite some noise complaints.

A unique legal settlement has gone down just across town from Lawyer.com headquarters here in Basking Ridge, NJ.  Apparently, a combo bar/restaurant called the Bamboo Grille had its liquor license suspended because of noise complaints from two neighbors.  Not, of course, the rowdy roadhouse kinds of noises like bar fights and hollers, but that of amplified live music.  Each spring prior to 2011, the bar opened up its mezzanine to the likes of acoustic duo 3 West and the Ed Fleischman Jazz trio.  Clearly, raucous and disruptive young punks.  These performances, from 7-10 pm Thursday through Saturday (what I like to call “bedtime for boring people”), were enough to rile up a couple of families across the way, who filed numerous complaints with the township over the course of three years.  In 2011, the township suspended Bamboo Grille’s liquor license, later returning it on the condition that the bar no longer use electricity for outdoor music.  Since then, the bar has been embroiled in a fight for their right to party.

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NJ School District to Pay $4.2 Million to Student Paralyzed by a Bully

A bully on the playground, by Flickr user "trix0r", licensed via Creative Commons.Sawyer Rosenstein was twelve years old when a bully punched him in his stomach hard enough to cause a blood clot in the artery that supplies blood to his spine.  Two days later, the injury paralyzed him from the waist down, permanently, in a series of events declared “incredibly rare”.  There is a certain heart-tugging sympathy we feel for the boy, because everyone has experienced a bully either as a victim or an agent or a powerless onlooker, and because in our experience bullying is merely “something kids just do”, and because this time it was more than that.  Imagine being confined to a wheelchair for the better part of your entire life all because of the baseless anger of a violent child.  Imagine no consequences to said child’s actions (the bully in this case, who was known to be one and had a history of violence, received only a few days’ suspension) and having to look him in the eye daily from your new wheelchair you’ll never leave.  Try to imagine — and this is the difficult part — whether a $4.8 million check would make that prison any better.

Read more to learn the facts behind this case