Connecticut Man Sues Citi Bike

Bike Craziness

Bikers Beware

Ronald Corwin is suing Citi Bike for $15 million. He currently suffers nerve damage in his brain as a result of a Citi Bike crash in NYC last October. Corwin was injured when he flipped over a bicycle he was riding after his front wheel hit a concrete barrier installed next to the bicycle docking station at E. 56th St. and Madison Ave. As a result of the crash Corwin currently suffers from traumatic nerve palsy that has left him unable to taste and smell. “Everything tastes like cardboard,” says Smiley (Corwin’s lawyer). “It’s terrible. He’s lost the pleasure of tasting food and of literally smelling the roses” (Lazzaro, 2014).

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Dead End Taxi

-Death Cab

Imagine waiting for someone you love dearly to arrive and when they do, you open the door to the taxi and they are dead. Sounds terrible, right? Well, that is was happened to a mother from North Carolina, Deborah Washington, who found her son A’Darrin Washington, “unresponsive and cold to the touch,” when he arrived home in a taxi.  A’Darrin Washington was discharged from Cumberland County Hospital and died on Nov. 22, 2011 at the age of 30 and was a patient of the hospital for 10 years. Ms. Washington is suing the security firm whose guards are accused of forcibly removing her son from a hospital even though he was allegedly dying or possibly already dead. Read More

Not So Neat: Whiskey Distilleries Spread Fungus

Bourbon casks at Laphroaig, by user John Allan, licensed by Creative Commons

The citizens of Louisville, Kentucky and the surrounding area have recently sued the local Whiskey distilleries because of a “black gunk” that was found over the roofs of their houses and cars.  As a result, property damage and negligence lawsuits have been filed against factories along the “Bourbon Trail.”  The main cause of the sooty germination is a naturally occurring fungus that latches onto ethanol, which many distilleries continue to emit.  Though monetary damages have not been specified many are asking the companies to reevaluate their environmental policies. Read more

Concussion Lawsuit may be the New England Patriots of Lawsuit Cases

Deflated Football, by Flickr user kevindean, licensed via Creative Commons.Ominous Metaphor

It can be assumed that one who takes part in violent activity is at risk of permanent injury.  In many cases, however, the reward is well worth the occupational health risks. This is a justification that can be seen as far back as Roman Gladiators, who won riches and celebrations across the Empire for their successes despite facing certain death for their failures.  The same holds true today, where aside from stunt drivers or Chris Brown’s girlfriend, a professional football player might be the most dangerous gig in the entertainment industry.  The shelf life of an NFL player, especially those at positions prone to poundings (such as running back), is only a few years. Players who have spent their lives honing their craft are given a very small timeframe to cash in on their talent and to position themselves financially for the future. Even if a player remains healthy, fatigue and athletic decline can be seen by the age of 30. Just ask the guy who drafts Chad Ochocinco in your fantasy league this year.

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Two Recent Negligence Settlements from Public Service Mistakes

Everyone makes mistakes, even those whose sworn mission is to protect and serve or to do no harm.  Two settlements were announced this week that demonstrate exactly that.  In Brooklyn, New York, a woman whose doctors’ negligence resulted in the amputation of her arms and legs was awarded $17.1 million.  In Tallahassee, Florida, the negligence of the police concerning a woman who was murdered during a botched drug sting operation led to a $2.4 million settlement for her family.  In both these cases, the professionals in charge, the ones whose judgement is awarded a certain amount of trust, made bad decisions that led to unfortunate consequences.  Everyone makes mistakes, but the law in general isn’t there to prevent that.  Rather, the law and the court system are intended to pursue justice among an otherwise ambivalent world.  And so, the silver lining: in Florida, a new regulation, called “Rachel’s Law” after the woman in question, was enacted to train policemen better and set up new guidelines in the use of criminal informants.

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