Age Discrimination Lawsuit

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“Age doesn’t matter, unless you’re cheese.”- Billie Burke

In this day and age, it is out with the old and in with the new. Who doesn’t want the newest iPad or HD TV? But, should the same logic apply when companies attempt to get rid of an older employee? How about when that employee is fulfilling his/her job expectations? In what has been suggested as the largest award in Los Angeles legal history, Bobby Nickel, age 66, was awarded $26 million by a jury that found he was discriminated against and harassed based on his age by his supervising managers at Staples. Bobby Nickel was hired by Corporate Express in 2002 as a facilities manager. In 2008, Corporate Express was acquired by Staples Contract and Staples Inc and Bobby Nickel lost his job in 2011, age 64. Read more

Battle Lines Drawn Over World War II Statue

Marines Memorial, by flickr user Jim Bowen, licensed by Creative Commons.

Healing Old Wounds

Residents of Southern California have filed a lawsuit against the city of Glendale over a controversial World War II statue. The $30,000 “Comfort Women” memorial is in honor of those Chinese and Korean women who were allegedly forced into prostitution by Imperial Japan in the 1930′s and 1940′s. The plaintiffs claim that the city is violating the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution, which is also referred to as “the law of the land”. Supporters of the statue are active in spreading word about the comfort women issue, while the Japanese government has never officially apologized on the record. While no dollar amount has been mentioned, many believe the plaintiffs are strictly interested in removing the statue altogether. Read more

Little Old Ladies From Pasadena Don’t Try To Choose The NFL

Blaine Gabbert, by Flickr user PDA.PHOTO, licensed using Creative Commons.

The Rose Bowl is also equipped with benches.

In the latest installment of the National Football League-to-Los Angeles saga, Pasadena City Council members voted 7 to 1 in favor of increasing the annual limit of big-time events at the Rose Bowl from 12 to 25.  The motive for adding dates lies primarily in temporarily bringing an NFL team (sic: the Jacksonville Jaguars) to the area while a new stadium in Los Angeles is finalized.  While the league, media, and NFL fans across the country would love for the entertainment capital of the world to have a team call Hollywood home the vote’s largest opponent may be its sternest competition: Pasadena residents.

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The Fire Rises: Hells Angels Lawsuit Heats Up

Hells Angels, the infamous motorcycle group from southern California, are filing suit in federal court against the United States. The dispute stands over the US’s ban of foreign members of the gang entering the country. Members of the Hells Angels have been convicted of multiple crimes, including drug trafficking, extortion, and other felonies in North America, South America, Europe.  The U.S. has classified the Hells Angels as a “known criminal organization,” but due to the suit the government is in the process of fielding the request for an injunction in which they cannot associate the Hell’s Angels with violence and crime.

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Happy Day for Former Sitcom Cast

Uncopyrighted publicity photo from Happy DaysQueue the jukebox: the ol’ gang just got an increase in allowance.

Happy Days actors Anson Williams, Don Most, Marion Ross, Erin Moran, and the estate of the late Tom Bosley have settled with CBS and Paramount over a contract dispute from April, 2011.  Potsie and co. believed they had not received proper royalties for the sales of Happy Days merchandising that used their images, including comic books, T-shirts, and trading cards.  (Yes, nearly three decades after Happy Days aired its last episode, they still make comic books and trading cards with the characters.)  The actors’ contracts included clauses that gave 5% of proceeds from any merchandise holding their image and 2.5% if they’re shown as a group, but they claim that CBS and Paramount never included merchandise figures in revenue statements provided to the actors.  CBS and Paramount’s counterclaim was that, under a separate agreement with the Screen Actors Guild, the companies were allowed to use images from the show to promote sales of DVDs without paying the actors any extra royalties.

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