Tourism Lawsuit Leaves Town Misguided

Lafayette Square, Savannah, GA by flickr user Chris Yates, licensed by Creative Commons

Hip to be square

Tour guides in vacation destinations may have to begin passing certifications to entertain tourists. One group in Savannah GA, headed by a woman named Michelle Freenor, has filed a lawsuit against the city itself over the certain registration laws. Michelle and 3 others (including her husband) have led walking tours around the historic town for years, before the word spread of a new ordinance them to become “certified tour guides”, passing medical and academic tests. The city stands firm behind the idea that registration can only help, not hinder the tourism industry in Savannah. The group is backed by non-profit law firm, with Freenor now at the head of a movement that has hit many popular destinations for tourists, including New York City, Washington D.C., and New Orleans. Read more

Battle Lines Drawn Over World War II Statue

Marines Memorial, by flickr user Jim Bowen, licensed by Creative Commons.

Healing Old Wounds

Residents of Southern California have filed a lawsuit against the city of Glendale over a controversial World War II statue. The $30,000 “Comfort Women” memorial is in honor of those Chinese and Korean women who were allegedly forced into prostitution by Imperial Japan in the 1930′s and 1940′s. The plaintiffs claim that the city is violating the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution, which is also referred to as “the law of the land”. Supporters of the statue are active in spreading word about the comfort women issue, while the Japanese government has never officially apologized on the record. While no dollar amount has been mentioned, many believe the plaintiffs are strictly interested in removing the statue altogether. Read more

Collateral Damage: Man Sues Bank After Collapse

bank vault dining, by flick user Ishrona, licensed by Creative Commons

Lock it up

Ever forget to make a payment or remember you owe money on a bill and have a panic attack? Something similar happened to 61 year-old John Stecher on his last visit to the bank, and as a result, the man collapsed from a heart attack. After receiving calls about a missed mortgage payment, Mr. Stecher walked into the Bank of America in Chartlotte, NC in attempts to get the situation straightened out. The bank stood by the assumption that they did not receive his payment, to which John became stressed out and experienced a heart attack. The man is now suing for $10,000, according to his lawyer Paul Goodson. Read more

Game Over for Software Store’s Re-Selling

UHHH, by photobucket user BRcouncil, licensed by Creative Commons

A Professional Headshot.

It appears that a popular video game retailer is playing some games of their own.  GameStop (NYSE: GME), whose headquarters is in Grapevine TX, has been named in a class-action lawsuit in regards to the selling of used video games without including all of the downloadable content, or DLC.  When purchasing a new video game, a special unique keycode is included that allows the purchaser access to new features, such as new weapons, enhanced features, or updated rosters.  The class-action states that since anyone who buys a used game does not have access to the keycode, and GameStop does not strictly state this, they are in violation of the Consumer Fraud Act. The suit was filed in New Jersey as each plaintiff is seeking about $10-$15 per game in locations across the state from Fall 2010 to Summer 2012. Read more

B-E Aggressive, But Don’t Consider It A Sport

Cheerleading: Bad for your budget, but great for your calves.

Cheerleading: Bad for your budget, but great for your calves.

A 2009 gender discrimination lawsuit filed by the Quinnipiac University Women’s Volleyball coach against the school has recently been settled. The settlement is of particular interest in athletic departments across the nation as it offers a solution to a frequently-had debate in the sports world: Is Cheerleading a sport? In an attempt to eliminate Quinnipiac’s volleyball program altogether, the school had intimated that sufficient resources had instead been allotted to competitive cheer and that they were therefore compliant under the guidelines of Title IX. Read more