Mayweather-Pacquiao Promoters Get Jabbed

Faded Glory, by flickr user Bryan Furnance, licensed by Creative Commons.

Jab, Cross, Hook

The sport of boxing has not had much of an impact on pop culture or news headlines in the past 20 years, and the latest event may have put the sport down for the count. The heavily-promoted match between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao has come under serious criticism for how uneventful and expensive it was, and now people are calling their lawyers. Multiple class-action lawsuits have been filed against all parties involved, especially the promoters of the fight itself. The pay-per-view main event charged $99 per household, with Mayweather winning in unexciting fashion; however it was revealed after the match that Pacquiao had a pretty serious shoulder injury. Plaintiff’s claim that they were duped into paying for the fight regardless of the promoters’ knowledge of the injury, choosing to “go on with the show” due to the massive amounts of money each company pulled in from advertising.

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California Man Blames Casino after Gambling Away Half a Million Dollars

Solar Casino Night

The Drinks Will Cost You!

Mark Johnston is suing a Las Vegas casino after losing $500,000 at a blackjack table. Johnson alleges that employees of the Downtown Grand Las Vegas served him so much alcohol that it caused him to blackout and he was unable to remember what happened. It is said that Johnston was visibly drunk and slurring his words therefore, should not have been allowed to gamble. Johnston believes that he was plied with liquor and victimized, he goes on to say “Just picture a drunk walking the street and he’s drunk, and someone pickpockets and takes his money from him. That’s how I characterize it,” Johnston said. “I feel like it’s the days of old Vegas, the way they’ve been extorting me with letters and attorneys” (Martinez, 2014).

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Parents Face Murder Charges After Beating Their 7 Year Old

Wooden Paddle by Flickr user AlishaV, licensed by Creative Commons

One of the many objects used for discipline

Roderick Arrington, a 7 year old from Las Vegas, passed away on November 30 after his mother and step-father beat him to death.  What was the reason?  He did not do his homework and lied about reading a bible passage.  He was admitted to the hospital on November 29 for sever bruising and brain swelling.  Roderick moved from Illinois where he was living with his father to Las Vegas with his mother Dina Palmer and step-father Markiece Palmer.  Dina would let Markiece discipline her son and would join in if her son was no obeying their rules.  Dina was involved in Roderick’s last beating and watched Markiece, “shake her son to death.”  Roderick, had bruises on the back of his buttocks, thighs, and back from various objects.

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Flava Flav gets Arrested for Assault

Alarm Clock, by Museum of Hartlepool licensed by Creative Commons.

Worn Around Flavor’s Neck

William J. Drayton, also known as Flavor Flav was arrested in Las Vegas, Nevada.  He was charged with assault with a deadly weapon and battery against Elizabeth Trujillo, his fiancée of 8 years, and her son.  Drayton and Trujillo got into a verbal confrontation over the fact that he cheated on her.  The argument allegedly escalated to a downstairs bedroom of their four-bedroom, 2, ½ bathroom house, where Drayton became physical with Trujillo.

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Videotaping Police: Dangerous, Lucrative, and Constitutionally Protected

Camera equipment, by Flickr user joshjanssen, licensed via Creative Commons
You should record the Po Po by all means, but you probably don’t need all this.

Two court settlements have come down this week that shine light on the increasingly-common practice of videotaping police officers.  In Las Vegas, Mitchell Crooks was beaten  up by a police officer while videotaping a burglary investigation across the street from his house.  In Boston, attorney Simon Glik was arrested and prosecuted under wiretapping laws for using his cell phone to record an arrest of another man.  All charges were dropped in both cases, but both men also sued for violations to their civil rights.  In both cases, they reached a settlement before going to court for a judgement, with Crooks receiving $100,000 and Glik receiving $170,000.  Nearly 6 months ago, Glik’s case even went to the 1st Circuit Appeals Court, where they upheld the rights of citizens to record public police action in a landmark, often-cited decision.

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