Time to Go Mobile as Judge Rules Against NSA

Bundesarchiv Bild, by Wikipedia user Greenshed, licensed by Creative Commons

Time to plug the leak?

More than a few years ago, the term “phone-mining” probably meant nothing to anyone.  Nowadays, it has become one of the most controversial topics all over the United States, including our federal courts.  A recent ruling states that the acquisition of data through mobile phones, including cell phone numbers and and timestamps, is unconstitutional. The case itself, Klayman v. Obama (13-cv-881), was heard in Washington D.C. under Judge Richard Leon.  This private collection of data was leaked by former NSA contractor and controversial figure Edward Snowden, who is currently living in Russia under temporary asylum. Read more

A Kodak Moment: Patents To Sell for $525 Million

Decorative Scales of Justice in the Courtroom

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It seems that film isn’t the only thing Kodak has been developing recently.  The famous digital imaging and photography company agreed to sell their patent portfolio to a large group of companies including Google, Apple, and Facebook.  Eastman Kodak, based in Rochester NY, is monetizing their patents to help recover from a recent bankruptcy.  Economists are predicting that the $525 million agreement will help Kodak re-emerge from Chapter 11 in the first half of 2013.  Amazon, Samsung, and Microsoft are also members of the 12-company group of licensees. Read more

Yelp Lawsuit Raises Freedom of Speech Issue

Thomas Jefferson by fotopedia user Navin Rajagopalan, licensed by Creative Commons

                   A rock-solid lawsuit?

The founding fathers could never have imagined what path freedom of speech has taken since our country’s inception.  Case in point, a character defamation lawsuit has been filed against a Yelp user who gave a negative review to a local contractor.  The defendant, Dietz Development, claims that online feedback is one of the most important ways a potential buyer or client uses when they make a decision on whether or not to use a service and is seeking $750,000 in damages.  The Yelp user, Jane Perez, has been defending her claims in court since late November, stating that she was simply exercising her freedom of speech after what she felt was an unsatisfying service.  A Judge in Southern California has ordered her to edit her comments via a preliminary injunction. Read more

Red Bull Space Jump & The Future of Patent Lawsuits

Speaking of Software Patents by Flickr User Opensourceway Licensed Under Creative Commons

                            Whose is it?

The Red Bull Stratos jump caused, 8.5 million people to watch Felix Baumgartner fall through the atmosphere at the speed of sound.  Red Bull was able to create a live moment that captivated millions.  Everyone was talking about Red Bull for days.  Obviously millions cannot witness the event live in-person, so the platform to deliver the message is equally as important.

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Apple Unveils iPad Mini

Decorative Scales of Justice in the Courtroom

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If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it; but you can always make it smaller.  Apple has officially unveiled the iPad Mini, the latest version of their revolutionary tablet.  Prices are starting with a $329 (the 64 GB will retail for $659).  The iPad Mini’s 7.9 inch display gives it a leg up over its competition such as the Google Nexus and Amazon’s Kindle.  The screen size puts it right between the iPad and the iPhone, catering quite nicely to loyal Apple owners who were looking for the middle ground.  iPad Mini pre-orders are already being taken through major outlets and the device will be officially released in the United States on November 2.  How excellent, just in time for the holiday shopping season.  Although, Apple shares took a 2% hit immediately following the announcement due to investor letdown. Read more