Time to Go Mobile as Judge Rules Against NSA

Bundesarchiv Bild, by Wikipedia user Greenshed, licensed by Creative Commons

Time to plug the leak?

More than a few years ago, the term “phone-mining” probably meant nothing to anyone.  Nowadays, it has become one of the most controversial topics all over the United States, including our federal courts.  A recent ruling states that the acquisition of data through mobile phones, including cell phone numbers and and timestamps, is unconstitutional. The case itself, Klayman v. Obama (13-cv-881), was heard in Washington D.C. under Judge Richard Leon.  This private collection of data was leaked by former NSA contractor and controversial figure Edward Snowden, who is currently living in Russia under temporary asylum. Read more

Facebook Faces Lawsuit Over Faces

Facebook like, by Owen W. Brown at owenwbrown.com, licensed via Creative Commons.

Like This Ad

Do you have a Facebook? If so, you might have been used for an ad and not have known it. If your Facebook account had a Facebook Sponsored Story, which featured your name or profile picture, you may be a member in a class action lawsuit. These Sponsored Stories are a form of advertising that typically contained posts, which would appear on Facebook.  These ads were from different businesses, organizations, or individuals who have paid to promote on Facebook, so there is a better chance that the posts will be seen.  Basically, the lawsuit alleges Facebook used users’ names and likenesses to sell/advertise products without the users’ consent. Read More

Misty VanHorn Arrested For Selling Her Children on Facebook

shopping Cart Dollar Sign by Flickr user One Way Stock, licensed by Creative Commons

Money in exchange for babies

An Oklahoma woman, Misty VanHorn, wound up in Sequoyah County Jail for trying to sell her two children on Facebook.

Read more

Like This: Facebook Sued Over Dead Man’s Patent

thumb thumbs up hand finger top tip, by pixabay user LoggaWiggler, licensed by Creative Commons.

No sir, I do not bite by thumb at you, sir

Mark Zuckerberg is no stranger to a lawsuit.  This time, Rembrandt Social Media is claiming that Facebook’s use of a “Like” button infringes upon a patent created in 1998 by a currently deceased Dutch programmer.  The brain behind social media giant Facebook, has time and time again had to defend his creation from a multitude of people who would like their piece of the pie.  The new suit, filed in a Virginia court on behalf Joannes Jozef Everardus van Der Meer, revolves around a failed social media network known as Surfbook, which involved the idea of pressing a “like” button to show approval.  The like button is a central idea powering Facebook that allows users to interact with a simple click instead of actually commenting on a post or picture. Read More

Pinterest Stuck With New Lawsuit

Pin Board Cork Wall Frame Memo, by Pixabay user Geralt, licensed by Creative Commons

                   Put it on the board!

The latest legal battle in social media could be a pretty sharp one.  The popular photo-sharing network Pinterest is being sued by a man claiming that a potential investor stole his ideas.  Theodore Schroeder of Ocean City, NJ cites that he met with several people while attempting to expand on his idea of a “board”-related social media site, called RendezVoo.  One of these venture capitalists was Brian Cohen, who eventually went on to make a deal with Pinterest which included, Schroeder claims, his own intellectual property.  Mr. Schroeder is seeking monetary compensation upwards of $75,000, stating that it took time, money, and other resources for him to continue his attempts to build RendezVoo.  Pinterest has countered saying the lawsuit, filed right around the holidays, is “baseless”. Read more