Class Action: Square Comes Full Circle

Anthony's Pizza, by PhotoZou user Mr. Utsuda, licensed via Creative Commons

A special delivery

A financial services & mobile payments company is now opening their own pockets after losing a class action lawsuit. Square, founded by Twitter CEO & Chairman Jack Dorsey, has agreed to pay $2.2m related to their food-delivery service. The class action lawsuit alleges that Square collected a small percentage of gratuity from online food orders, but withheld this money from the drivers & delivery services. Plaintiff Spencer Janssen is set to receive $10,000, while the firm who represents him is seeking $755,000 in fees. The rest of the money will be divided among the other class-action members, averaging about $15 per person. Caviar, the name of Square’s food delivery service, has been set to pay out any users between January 2012 and August 2015. Read More

Bitcoin: Getting Cryptic with Coinbase

bitcoin, by pixabay user MichaelWuensch, licensed by Creative Commons.

Coinbase off base?

The world of bitcoin and cryptocurrency is very… well, cryptic. The exchanging of “internet money” with fluid values that rise and fall is reminiscent of the stock market, without any government regulation. As more people learn what crypto is and how it works, there are going to be players that become the gold standard in the space. Unfortunately, there are also going be people who can find ways to profit from it. With no one to regulate what goes on, would it be possible for a “CEO” from a crypto startup to steal money from his own clients? This is the latest issue with the most popular cryptocurrency exchange platform, Coinbase, which is being sued after they failed to raise alarms about a money laundering scheme. The case is now going to a jury trial after the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals denied an appeal in district court. Read more

Former NFL Players Rush to Meet Class Action Deadline

Silver Football and NFL Logo On Top of a Green Field, by flickr user C_osett, licensed by Creative Commons.

Head games

Former NFL football players who have suffered from neurological damage and head injuries foresee an approaching resolution to the six-year-long legal battle against the NFL. This fight initiated in 2011 and settled in 2013; however, it was determined that the $765 million settlement was not enough money to cover the cost of compensation for the 20,000 former NFL players involved in the lawsuit. In 2015, after extensive negotiations, a federal judge removed the limit of $765 million to leave room for a potentially higher payout. The family members of those whom have since passed away as a result of chronic head damage may also benefit from this lawsuit. Read more

West Goes South in Rap Lawsuit

wave, by Pixabary user NeuPaddy, licensed by Creative Commons

Talk about a Tidal wave

Kanye West is always in the tabloid and music headlines, but a recent lawsuit is truly making him Famous. Citing “deceptive conduct”, a class action lawsuit was filed against the Chicago rapper over his latest album release. “The Life of Pablo” was exclusively released on music streaming service Tidal in early 2016. Since then, Kanye has remixed and reworked some of the album’s tracks and re-released them; however the Tidal version is still the original “incomplete” version. Later on, the album was released across all music services (iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, etc). The class action lawsuit claims that West duped fans by selling the idea that the album would only be available via Tidal. Read More

Should You Eat Your Vitamins?

Health, cure, vitamins, by pixabay user Miziankika, licensed by Creative Commons.

Everything in moderation…

We’ve been told since childhood to take our daily vitamins, but sometimes they do more harm than good. In March 2017, a consumer fraud class action lawsuit was filed against popular vitamin manufacturer Vitafusion for that reason. Vitafusion lists 400 mg of folacin on the label of its flavored multivitamins. However, test results show an actual amount of 1,232 mg, which exceeds the “upper tolerable intake limit” of 1,000 mg set by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Read More