The Witch Hunt Finally Ends for Amanda Todd

Maggie Wall's memorial by Flickr user Andy Hawkins, licensed by Creative Commons

Amanda Todd Witch Hunt?

Amanda Todd, a 15 year old from British Columbia, has taken her life due to years of torment from her peers and community.  The young girl had made the mistake of flashing her breasts to a gentleman online during a slumber party.  This man found her on Facebook and sent the pictures out to all her friends and classmates.  She was chastised and bullied for her adolescent decision for years, even having to move more than once to escape the agony.  Todd made a Youtube video reaching out for help, stating that she had once tried to take her life and that she needed someone to lend a hand.  The authorities knew about the pictures and the school system knew of her suicidal threats, but then where were they when she actually decided to end it?  The real important question is why is this disturbing gentleman, who took Todd’s intimate pictures viral, not locked up?  I guess a number of people had the same question because the group Anonymous, an unlikely hero in certain aspects, outed the pervert’s name, address, and age.  

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NJ School District to Pay $4.2 Million to Student Paralyzed by a Bully

A bully on the playground, by Flickr user "trix0r", licensed via Creative Commons.Sawyer Rosenstein was twelve years old when a bully punched him in his stomach hard enough to cause a blood clot in the artery that supplies blood to his spine.  Two days later, the injury paralyzed him from the waist down, permanently, in a series of events declared “incredibly rare”.  There is a certain heart-tugging sympathy we feel for the boy, because everyone has experienced a bully either as a victim or an agent or a powerless onlooker, and because in our experience bullying is merely “something kids just do”, and because this time it was more than that.  Imagine being confined to a wheelchair for the better part of your entire life all because of the baseless anger of a violent child.  Imagine no consequences to said child’s actions (the bully in this case, who was known to be one and had a history of violence, received only a few days’ suspension) and having to look him in the eye daily from your new wheelchair you’ll never leave.  Try to imagine — and this is the difficult part — whether a $4.8 million check would make that prison any better.

Read more to learn the facts behind this case