Aaron Hernandez ‘Victim’ Seeks $100,000

Football field, by flickr user nightthree, licensed by Creative Commons

More than just a 15-yard penalty

Unsportsmanlike conduct could be a bit of an understatement.  After being indicted for the alleged murder of a man in Massachusetts, Aaron Hernandez, former Tight End for the New England Patriots, is also being sued.  Alexander Buckley claims that when Hernandez was in college in Florida, he was “shot and left for dead” by the former NFL star.  Summoned to the stand during the grand jury investigation into Hernandez, Buckley was asked about the incident that left him with a missing eye.  A Superior Court judge in Falls River, MA motioned to see what more information Buckley had against Hernandez.  Buckley is seeking $100,000 in damages. Read more

Statistics Reveal Surprisingly Few DUI Arrests In Boston

A recent and surprising story from the Boston Globe discussed what appears to be an abnormally low number of drunk driving arrests reported in a major American city. Numbers obtained by the Boston Globe revealed that police in Boston only made 241 drunk driving arrests in all of 2012, shocking numbers given Boston’s rank as the 10th largest metro area in the country.

The number of DUI arrests in Boston is confusing given that it not only pales in comparison to the numbers for similar sized and even smaller cities, but also because it reflects a dramatic drop from numbers seen only a few years ago. The data revealed that since 2009, the number of drunk driving arrests in the city have dropped by an astounding 33 percent.

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Bad Reception: Web-TV Service Avoids Lawsuit

antenna home roof watch tv sky send transmitter by, Pixabay user Hans, licensed by Creative Commons.

Hello, is there anybody in there?

There seems to be a buzz in the air around New York City recently and cable/satellite providers aren’t happy about it.  The internet-powered television service, Aereo, allows users to enjoy basic programs for an incredibly small cost and has thrived despite a growing number of lawsuits.  Companies such as Cablevision contend that this alternative to their offerings violates certain copyrights and contracts.  Aereo argues that since their units include small antennas, the analog signal they pick up is free over the airwaves and not breaking any laws.  Aereo, which is backed by media executive Barry Diller, plans to grow their service area over the next few months including major cities such as Washington D.C., Boston, and Chicago. Read more

Trader Joe Meets A Man Named Sal… Monella?

Salty Peanut by Flickr User EuroMagic, Licensed Under Creative Commons

Note: Peanuts might contain Salmonella

A family in Boston is pursuing legal action against one of the largest grocery chains in America. Trader Joe’s is being sued by the Henson family in South Grafton, Massachusetts after their son contract salmonella from peanut butter purchased at the store. The boy developed a fever exceeding 100 degrees and had to be taken to a local doctor multiple times before the cause of the sickness was discovered. The Henson family is seeking financial reimbursement to help pay their medical bills, as well as attempting to raise awareness for manufacturing and packaging companies. Trader Joe’s themselves and Sunland, Inc are the companies named in the lawsuit.
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Videotaping Police: Dangerous, Lucrative, and Constitutionally Protected

Camera equipment, by Flickr user joshjanssen, licensed via Creative Commons
You should record the Po Po by all means, but you probably don’t need all this.

Two court settlements have come down this week that shine light on the increasingly-common practice of videotaping police officers.  In Las Vegas, Mitchell Crooks was beaten  up by a police officer while videotaping a burglary investigation across the street from his house.  In Boston, attorney Simon Glik was arrested and prosecuted under wiretapping laws for using his cell phone to record an arrest of another man.  All charges were dropped in both cases, but both men also sued for violations to their civil rights.  In both cases, they reached a settlement before going to court for a judgement, with Crooks receiving $100,000 and Glik receiving $170,000.  Nearly 6 months ago, Glik’s case even went to the 1st Circuit Appeals Court, where they upheld the rights of citizens to record public police action in a landmark, often-cited decision.

Click to read more after the jump