Drinkable Sunscreen Leaves Bad Taste

Hot Sun, by pixabay user merkure, licensed by Creative Commons.

Man, it’s a hot one.

Sunscreen, or sun tan lotion, is a very important element to enjoying a healthy lifestyle. While we all love getting outside and enjoying the sunshine, we have to be careful to protect our skin from the sun’s potentially harmful UV rays. We have all experienced sunburn at one time or another, which is a price many people are willing to pay for a nice-looking summer tan. It turns out that a Colorado company claimed that a version of their sunscreen was more than just a defense mechanism for the sun; that it was actually drinkable. The state of Iowa and their attorney general thought different, and has now filed a lawsuit against “Osmosis” and “Harmonized Water”.

The makers of the drinkable sunscreen ensure that their product is actually just water, and the “protect yourself again the sun” is just a marketing angle. Still, Tom Miller (Iowa’s attorney general) has a problem with that. “It’s flat-out dangerous to consumers to make them think without any proof that this water protects them from what we know is proven, potentially cancer-causing exposure to the sun.” The product itself is called “UV Neutralizer”, and has sold 35 bottles in the past 5 years. The Iowa AG is seeking compensation for those who have purchased the product, in the amount of $30-40. The lawsuit was filed in the Iowa District Court in Polk County.

There is no doubt here that the product is a bit misleading. Yes, it’s true that water is a way to protect yourself against the sun; but by the means of hydration, not by applying to the skin. It is surprising that consumers would actually take the bait and spend $30 on a bottle of water with a fancy marketing label by the Colorado-based company, however the side effect of that should not be something that puts them in danger. While there are no reports of anyone being burned after using the product, there is certainly a small pool to pull from (35 people). There certainly seems to be something in the water in Colorado.

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